General John Logan

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, June 13, 1863

Welcome to our collection of original Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers. These papers are online, and you can dig in and study all the important details of the war. The illustrations were created by eye-witnesses and give new perspective on this historic conflict.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

John Logan

General John Logan

Cavalry Poem

Cavalry Poem

Flag Poem

Flag Poem

Treatment of Prisoners

Treatment of Prisoners

Brashear City

Brashear City

Pocket Watch

Pocket Watch Advertisement

General Grant on Horseback

Battle of Raymond

Battle of Raymond

Union Prisoners

Home From the War

 

 

 

VOL. VII.—No. 337.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, JUNE 13, 1863.

SINGLE COPIES SIX CENTS.

$3,00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1863, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


THE ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.

WE devote considerable space this week to illustrations of the Army of the Tennessee, whose splendid exploits are the theme of every conversation. On pages 376 and 377 we give an equestrian portrait of its gallant Commander, MAJOR-GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT, showing him where always he shines most—under fire; in our last number we gave a brief sketch of his life and career.

On this page we give a portrait, from a photo-graph by Anthony, of MAJOR GENERAL JOHN A. LOGAN, one of the most gallant of Grant's division commanders. General Logan first attracted public attention as a member of Congress from Illinois. A lawyer by trade, he was a strong Democrat in politics; in Congress he generally acted with Senator Douglas and his friends. When the secession of the South became imminent, he was one of the most decided of the Western members in opposing the movement and in warning the Southern members, with whom he had previously acted, that their folly would unite men of all parties at the North against them. His memorable threat—that " the men of the Northwest would cleave their way down the Mississippi Valley to the Gulf of Mexico with their swords" - we illustrated last week. At the actual outbreak of war, Mr. Logan resigned his seat in Congress, and though representing a district in which Copperheadism was rampant, raised a regiment, and entered the service as its Colonel. Like McClernand and Wallace, he soon proved himself as able in the field as he had been in the courts and political assemlblages. He served with credit under Grant at Fort Donelson, and again at Shiloh, and was speedily promoted to a Brigadier-Generalship. On the reorganization of the Army of the Tennessee last fall, General Logan took command of a division, and was appointed and confirmed a Major-General. In the recent campaign against Vicksburg he distinguished himself conspicuously.

The pictures on this page, and on page 372, are from sketches by Mr. Theodore R. Davis, our special artist who accompanied General Grant. He writes :

CROSSING BAYOU PIERRE.

"HEAD-QUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS, NEAR BLACK RIVER, MISS., May 4, 1863.  

" On the night of the first ult. the routed and disheartened rebels, under General Bowen, crossed and burned the bridge over the Bayou Pierre at Port Gibson. "At early dawn on the second our men were on

the march in eager pursuit of the flying foe. A raft bridge was speedily constructed by the negro engineer corps, under the command of the engineer officer of General Logan's division, Captain Trisilian.

"Passing, I may say of Captain T. that he is considered one of the very best officers that we have. He has organized a corps of willing workers—negroes, who have fled from the swamps and fastnesses in which they were 'corraled' in droves like cattle. The brave soldiers of the gallant Logan's division, more than impatient at the necessary delay, were speedily crossing the just completed bridge. The yet burning structure and the often-clouded night moon lent ' aid and comfort' to McPherson's corps, and they pressed on in hot haste to reach, if possible, the fleet-footed chivalry."

SHELLING THE REBEL REAR

"HEAD-QUARTERS MAJOR-GENERAL M'PHERSON, NEAR BLACK RIVER, MISS., May 4, 1863.

"During the day the rebel force under General Bowen were closely followed in their hasty flight by a portion of General McPherson's command, the divisions of Generals Logan and Crocker. The rich hues of sunset were tinging the western skies as our advance reached the river. The rebel rear was exposed, and a piece of Captain De Golyer's battery being brought into position at top speed of its horses, its shot soon reached the tender part. The haste of the flying rebels may be imagined by the fact that General Bowen left his 'presented pistol' upon the hastily constructed bridge."

THE BATTLE OF RAYMOND.

"HEAD-QUARTERS MAJOR-GENERAL McPHERSON, MAY 13, 1863

"At 10 o'clock on the 12th the 'Body Guard,' under Captain Foster, discovered the enemy in small force upon the road three miles from Raymond. A portion of General Dennis's brigade—the Twentieth Ohio and Thirtieth Illinois Regiments —were deployed to the right and left of the road. Being advanced, the enemy were discovered in line of battle, occupying a commanding position, a mile and a half from Raymond.

" A section of De Golyer's battery was placed in position in the road, and at a distance of one thousand yards opened the fight, when the whole battery was placed in position, with the brigade of General Dennis for its support, it being in turn supported by the brigades of Generals Smith and Stevenson, who soon after formed in line of battle upon the right. These troops, constituting Gener- (Next Page)

MAJOR-GENERAL JOHN A. LOGAN.—[PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANTHONY.]

GENERAL LOGAN CROSSING THE BAYOU PIERRE IN PURSUIT OF THE REBELS.—[SKETCHED BY MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

Picture
General John Logan
General Logan Crossing Pierre Bayou

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $185.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net


 

 

 

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