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Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 24, 1863

Welcome to our online archive of Harper's Weekly newspapers. This collection is available for your study and research. These old newspapers allow you to gain new insights into this important period in American History.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

General Sherman

General W. T. Sherman

Monitor Wreck

Wreck of the Monitor

Battle of Galveston

Battle of Galveston

Telegraph

Civil War Telegraph

Signal Station

Signal Station

Emancipation

Negro Emancipation

Wreck of the Monitor

Wreck of the Monitor

Slave Pen

Slave Pen

Winter Quarters

Winslow Homer's "Winter Quarters"

Emancipated Slaves

Emancipated Slaves

Shreman Biography

Sherman Biography

Brute Butler

Brute Butler

 

 

 

 

 JANUARY 24, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

61

A SLAVE-PEN AT NEW ORLEANS—BEFORE THE AUCTION. A SKETCH OF THE PAST.

(Previous Page) of vessels before they can be deemed safe or seaworthy.

THE MONITOR.

Oh, loyal souls, sunk in a noble ship
As e'er the waters crossed!

What direful tidings ring from every lip—

"The Monitor is lost!"

Sunk in an instant underneath the wave,

With half the crew lost in a watery grave.

 

And yet not lost. Within a higher realm

We deem they are at rest,

Where a sure Pilot stands beside the helm: Surely such peace is best.

There quietly the ship at anchor rides, Beyond all fear of adverse winds and tides.

 

Tenderly, brothers, will we name them o'er,

Nor think they died in vain,

Who went down with the Monitor, no more

To hoist our flag again.

Their early call has left no more to do;

But who could falter with their names in view?

 

OUR "MONITOR"—she earned her title well,

Though short the race she run;

She left a record, for the world to tell,

Of "victory nobly won."

Tenderly guard her in thy depths, O sea!

For never nobler vessel sailed o'er thee.

A SLAVE-PEN AT NEW ORLEANS.

IN connection with the gradual downfall of slavery, we publish on this page an illustration of a gang of negroes in a slave-pen at New Orleans before an auction. The picture is from a sketch taken by a foreign artist before the war. In describing it the artist wrote:

"The men and women are well clothed, in their Sunday best—the men in blue cloth of good quality, with beaver hats; and the women in calico dresses, of more or less brilliancy, with silk bandana handkerchiefs bound round their heads.

Placed in a row in a quiet thoroughfare, where, without interrupting the traffic, they may command a good chance of transient custom, they stand through a great part of the day, subject to the inspection of the purchasing or non-purchasing passing crowd. They look heavy, perhaps a little sad, but not altogether unhappy."

EXODUS OF REBEL WOMEN.

WE illustrate on this page a scene which is frequently renewed at Washington, viz., THE DEPARTURE OF SECESH WOMEN FOR RICHMOND. (Next Page)

SECESH WOMEN LEAVING WASHINGTON FOR RICHMOND.—[SKETCHED BY MR. JASPER GREEN.]

Slave Pen
Rebel Women

 

 

 

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