Telegraph

 

This Site:

Civil War

Civil War Overview

Civil War 1861

Civil War 1862

Civil War 1863

Civil War 1864

Civil War 1865

Civil War Battles

Confederate Generals

Union Generals

Confederate History

Robert E. Lee

Civil War Medicine

Lincoln Assassination

Slavery

Site Search

Civil War Links

 

Civil War Art

Mexican War

Republic of Texas

Indians

Winslow Homer

Thomas Nast

Mathew Brady

Western Art

Civil War Gifts

Robert E. Lee Portrait


Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 24, 1863

Welcome to our online archive of Harper's Weekly newspapers. This collection is available for your study and research. These old newspapers allow you to gain new insights into this important period in American History.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

General Sherman

General W. T. Sherman

Monitor Wreck

Wreck of the Monitor

Battle of Galveston

Battle of Galveston

Telegraph

Civil War Telegraph

Signal Station

Signal Station

Emancipation

Negro Emancipation

Wreck of the Monitor

Wreck of the Monitor

Slave Pen

Slave Pen

Winter Quarters

Winslow Homer's "Winter Quarters"

Emancipated Slaves

Emancipated Slaves

Shreman Biography

Sherman Biography

Brute Butler

Brute Butler

 

 

 

 

JANUARY 24, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

53

THE ARMY TELEGRAPH—SETTING UP THE WIRE DURING AN ACTION.—[SKETCHED BY MR. A. R. WAUD.]

THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC.

WE continue our series of illustrations of the Army of the Potomac. On page 52 we publish a picture by Mr. W. Homer illustrating CAMP-LIFE IN WINTER.

Mr. Homer shows us the interior of a hut, in

which a glowing fire is blazing, shedding light and warmth around. Stretched on the floor, bunks, and seats, are soldiers in every imaginable position —smoking, chatting, reading, card-playing, and sleeping. Almost in every company there is one sharp-witted fellow who can tell a good story. The soldiers' great delight is to get this man into

a tent or hut, and start him on a good long old-fashioned yarn, which lasts from dark until far on in the night. The scene—while the narrator is harrowing the imaginations of his rapt hearers, and the red glare of the fire lights up odd spots in the darkness—is very striking. On this page Mr. Waud has illustrated for us the

ARMY TELEGRAM.

Of this important institution he says: "The army signal-telegraph has been so far perfected that in a few hours quite a large force can be in constant connection with head-quarters. This, while a battle is progressing, is a great convenience. The wire used is a copper one insulated, (Next Page)

THE ARMY TELEGRAPH—THE OPERATOR AT WORK.—[SKETCHED BY MR. A. R. WAUD.]

A SIGNAL STATION AT NIGHT.—[SKETCHED BY MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

Civil War Telegraph
Telegraph Operator
Signal Station

 

 

 

Site Copyright 2003-2013 Son of the South. For Questions or comments about this collection, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

privacy policy

Are you Scared and Confused? Read My Snake Story, a story of hope and encouragement, to help you face your fears.