The Pirate "Tacony"

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 11, 1863

Welcome to our online collection of Harper's Weekly newspapers. Harper's Weekly was the most popular illustrated newspaper of the day, and our online archive will serve as a source of incredible details on the war. Serious students today can gain interesting insights into the important events of the war by diving into this incredible resource.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

General Meade

General Meade

Harlem Railway

Harlem Railway Affair

Meade Takes Command

General Meade Takes Command

Tacony

Pirate "Tacony"

Upperville

Upperville Battle

Atlanta

Confederate Ironclad "Atlanta"

Upperville Battle

Battle of Upperville

Major Kiernan

Major Kiernan

Siege of Vicksburg

Picture of the Siege of Vicksburg

Port Hudson

Pictures of the Siege of Port Hudson

Capture of Atlanta

Capture of the Ironclad "Atlanta"

Drummer Boy

Drummer Boy

Pennsylvania Cartoon

Pennsylvania Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 11, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

441

THE PIRATE "TACONY" BURNING MERCHANT VESSELS AND FISHING CRAFT.

THE PIRATES OFF NEW
ENGLAND.

WE publish herewith a picture of the rebel privateer Tacony burning a merchant vessel, and preparing to make a foray among fishing craft; and likewise an illustration of the explosion of the revenue cutter Caleb Cushing near Portland. The story of these pirates may thus be briefly told:

Lieutenant Reed, who commanded the Tacony, left Mobile in the Florida on 16th January last. From that time up to May 6th the Florida burned eleven vessels and bonded three. On 6th May she captured the brig Clarence, which was converted into a pirate, and Lieutenant Reed was put on board of her. She burned three vessels; then captured the Tacony, to which craft Reed transferred his men and guns, and burned the Clarence. The

Tacony fairly ravaged our coast, burning ships, barks, and fishing craft alike. On 24th June, fearing that the Tacony would be recognized and captured, Lieutenant Reed transferred his crew to the schooner Archer, which he had captured. In this vessel he boldly ran into the harbor of Portland in the night, and, with two boats' crews, boarded and cut out the revenue cutter Caleb Cushing. When daylight broke, and the people of Portland

discovered the absence of the cutter, they quickly manned two steamers and gave chase. Coming up with her about twelve miles front Portland, fire was opened; but the steamers evincing an intention to board her at once, Reed took to the boats, fired the cutter, and blew her up. The boats were picked up by the steamers, and the pirates safely lodged in Fort Preble, where they will have time for repentance.

THE REVENUE CUTTER "CALEB CUSHING" BLOWN UP BY REED AND THE OTHER PIRATES WHO HAD SEIZED HER.

The "Tacony"
Caleb Cushing

 

 

 

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