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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 25, 1863

Welcome to our online collection of Harper's Weekly newspapers. We hope you enjoy browsing through these old newspapers. We have posted them so that they look identical to the original documents, and they allow you to step back in time and see the war unfold week by week.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Ulysses S. Grant

Ulysses S. Grant

Draft Riots

Draft Riots

Riots

New York Riots

Fort Hill Explosion, Vicksburg

Gettysburg

Battle of Gettysburg Description

Vicksburg Explosion

Vicksburg Explosion

Peace Cartoon

Peace Cartoon

 

Siege of Vicksburg

Siege of Vicksburg

Port Hudson

Siege of Port Hudson

Carlisle

Carlisle, Pennsylvania

Gettysburg

The Battle of Gettysburg

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JULY 25, 1863.

478

LAST WORDS.

HE knelt beside her dying bed;

"Speak, daughter, speak!" the old man said;

And she, "'Tis dark; where is he—where?

I fain would smooth his wavy hair."

"O leave me not, my child," he said;

And she, "I know, when I am dead,

You'll let him for a little space

Gaze on my still and shrouded face."

"Child, he is here," the father said.

Her feeble arms she open spread,

Her lips to his she strove to press,

And clasp'd him in a mute caress.

"Forgive!" the father cried, "forgive!

To he his wife wilt thou not live?"

"I do forgive, and bless"—she said,

Her eyelids fluttered, she was dead!

Poor lover! poorer father! he

Through life that thin white face will see.

THE TAKING OF VICKSBURG.

WE publish on page 465 a new portrait of Major-General Grant, the hero of Vicksburg. Most of the portraits in existence represent him as he was at the commencement of the war, with a flowing beard. He has since trimmed this hirsute appendage, and now looks as he is shown in our picture. For a life of the General we refer to page 365, No. 336, of Harper's Weekly. He has just been appointed by the President Major-General in the regular army.

On page 468 we reproduce a sketch by our special artist, Mr. Theodore R. Davis, showing the rebel works at Vicksburg from our extreme right, with the Mississippi above and below Vicksburg.

Mr. Davis writes:

THE VIEW FROM THE RIFLE-PITS AT THE
EXTREME RIGHT.

"HEAD-QUARTERS OF MAJOR-GENERAL McPHERSON,

June 22, 1863.

"The scene at this point embraces so much that the public is familiar with, that has been mapped, sketched, and written of, that the present sketch must be of interest to many. It shows the very commanding position passed so often by our fleets, the lower batteries that sunk the boat of the gallant Bache—the Cincinnati—Young's Point, etc. Below is Warrenton, and faint in the distance the canal. Even the 'Bohemians' have an interest in the sketch, for is not the work upon which the rebel flag waves the very battery that disturbed their quietude the last summer, and more lately sank the little tug which sent upon an involuntary journey through 'Dixie' Colburn, Brown, and Richardson? The soldiers in the trench give a view of trench life: while some smoke, read, or chat, gun in hand, others are on the qui vive for a good chance, which means, in soldier parlance, an opportunity to end the chapters of some rebel's book of life."

On page 469 we give a view of Vicksburg as it was before the war; and three pictures from sketches by Mr. Davis, showing the operation of mining a hostile work. Mr. Davis thus describes them:

MINING THE REBEL WORK FORT HILL.

"HEAD-QUARTERS OF MAJOR-GENERAL MCPHERSON,

June 26, 1863.

"At this moment we have effected a lodgment in the work known as Fort Hill. This has been done by blowing up a portion of the work, when it was speedily converted into a bastion work for two guns.

"I have sketched the effect of a hand grenade in the trench, showing, at the same time, the entrance of the gallery leading to the mines.

"I have also sketched the miners busily at work far under the rebel wall. The different mines (four in number) were exploded at the same moment. The dust and smoke had not cleared away when a portion of General Logan's division dashed into the saps and trenches, from which they had been withdrawn prior to the explosion. From the advance trench they swarmed into the cavity made by the blast. Here were soon busily engaged the engineer corps, under Chief Engineer Captain Hickenlooper, who, with magnificent coolness, held his post under a severe fire. The lodgment was soon complete, and the position ours."

By way of completing the history, we append the following particulars of the surrender. A dispatch dated Head-quarters General Grant, near Vicksburg, July 3, 8 P.M., said:

At eight this morning flags of truce appeared before A. J. Smith's front, when Major-General Bowen and Colonel Montgomery were led blindfolded into our lines. They bore a communication from General Pemberton of the following purport:

"Although I feel confident of my ability to resist your arms indefinitely, in order to stop the further effusion of blood, I propose that you appoint three Commissioners, to meet three whom I shall select, to arrange such terms as may best accomplish the result."

Grant soon replied substantially in these words:

"The appointment of Commissioners is unnecessary. While I should be glad to stop any unnecessary effusion of blood, the only terms which I can entertain are those of unconditional surrender. At the same time, myself, and men, and officers of this army, are ready to testify to the distinguished gallantry with which the defense of Vicksburg has been conducted."

At eleven o'clock the messengers returned. This afternoon General Grant met General Pemberton between the lines, and after an hour's consultation settled the surrender. General Pemberton urged that the soldiers might be paroled here and furnished rations to carry them to their lines; in view of the bravery they have displayed, and the advantages of the plan, General Grant consented.

The correspondent of the Cincinnati Commercial gives the following account of the interview between Generals Grant and Pemberton:

General Pemberton then solicited a personal interview, which was granted by Grant at 3 P.M. The latter, with his staff, appeared on the hills where our advance works were. Here the party halted, until General Pemberton appeared, accompanied by General Bowen and Colonel Montgomery. On the crest of the opposite hills were rifle-pits and forts, crowded with men. In the space in a grove of fruit trees of figs and peaches met the contending heroes. Thousands of soldiers looked upon this strange scene. Two

men who had been lieutenants in the same regiment in Mexico now met as foes, with all the world looking upon them. The one his country's glory, the other his country's shame.

When they had approached within a few feet there was a halt and silence.

Colonel Montgomery spoke—"General Grant, General Pemberton." They shook hands politely. It was evident Pemberton was mortified. He said: "I was at Monterey and Buena Vista. We had terms and conditions there."

General Grant then took him aside. They sat down on the grass and talked more than an hour. Grant smoked all the time. Pemberton played with the grass and pulled leaves. Grant finally agreed to parole them, allowing the officers each his horse.

It was a polite thing. The dread of going North, and the fear of harsh treatment, had deterred them from capitulating sooner. He proved his magnanimity, and saved thousands upon thousands of dollars in the way of transportation and rations. They feared the Fourth of July. Our men would call out at night that the Fourth would finish them, and it was so arranged. By this we have saved thousands of lives. Both armies are gratified with the result. Our men treat them with kindness, giving them coffee, which some of them have not tasted for a year.

A correspondent of the Missouri Democrat says:

At ten o'clock A.M. of the 4th, General Steele's division marched into and garrisoned the city. The bands played the national airs of the contending forces. The scene was witnessed by thousands of Federal and rebel soldiers, who for the first time in weeks showed themselves with impunity above the rifle-pits; and during all these weeks they had been within five yards of each other.

General Grant came slowly to the place of rendezvous, smoking a cigar, and apparently the only unexcited person in the vast assemblage.

The Herald correspondent telegraphs by way of Cairo:

General McPherson received the formal surrender. The terms allow the officers and men to be paroled here, the former to retain their side-arms and horses and personal property. They will be escorted beyond our lines and furnished with three days provisions from our stores.

General Logan's division marched into the city at eleven o'clock, and at noon Lieutenant-Colonel Strong hoisted the Stars and Stripes over the Court-house.

Colonel Wilson is Provost-Marshal of the city, and General Logan is commander of the post.

We have taken over 27,000 prisoners, besides about 4000 non-combatants, 102 field-pieces, thirty siege-guns, 50,000 stand of arms, ammunition, locomotives, cars, a few stores, and fifty-seven stand of colors.

Among the prisoners are Lieutenant-General Pemberton, Major-Generals S. Stevenson, Smith, Forney, and Bowen; fourteen Brigadier-Generals and about one hundred and thirty Colonels.

There are 5600 men in the hospital, half of whom are wounded. Only one hundred and fifty of the garrison are reported fit for duty. The stock of provisions was almost exhausted, and for days numbers had been eating mule-flesh.

Of ammunition for heavy guns they had a fair supply, but for field-guns and musketry they were short. Eight caps to a man were allowed. They had an excess of sugar, molasses, and rice, and these were all the supplies they had, except a little unground corn.

THE GREAT RIVER BATTERY
AT PORT HUDSON.

WE present our readers on page 476 with a birds-eye view of the great river battery erected by our forces for the reduction of Port Hudson, and which is placed at the extreme left of our line, close upon the Mississippi River. Our correspondent sends us the following description:

"I rode out yesterday afternoon (the 24th June), in company with Major G. B. Halsted, General Augur's Adjutant-General, and Colonel Prince, of the Sixth Illinois Cavalry, to visit the great battery at our left, which I knew had been for days past in active preparation. Passing by General Dwight's head-quarters, and the long range of abandoned outer rebel batteries, we plunged into the woods leading toward the river, and after mounting a steep wooded ascent came suddenly upon this magnificent work, close to the river-side.

"The scene presented was very striking—and, indeed, astonishing, considering the time in which these enormous works had been constructed.

"This battery was not commenced until Tuesday the 16th, and was finished by the evening of Tuesday the 23d, under the immediate supervision of that able and indefatigable officer, Major J. Bailey, of the Fourth Wisconsin, acting Engineer officer of General Sherman's staff. To form it he had three companies of Louisiana Engineers (First Engineers of the Corps d'Afrique), under Major Robinson, and two regiments of Ullman's brigade, making about 1400 negroes in all, who were kept at work night and day—two parties of 700 relieving each other alternately.

"The battery mounts one 9-inch navy gun, three 24-pounders, two 30-pound Parrotts, three 20-pound Parrotts, two 8-inch howitzers, and six Napoleon guns; there are, besides, three mortars and one 8-inch howitzer in a separate battery alongside. The magazine compartment is most complete; and away on the left of the picture, down the declivity of the hill toward the river, a magnificent series of rifle-pits have been constructed. The breast-works are formed of cotton-bales and sand-bags covered with earth; and the whole presents one of the most splendid pieces of scientific engineering ever seen.

"What most astonished me on arriving at these works was to see our men carelessly standing on the parapets; and the more so when, on mounting them myself, I saw how dreadfully near we were to the rebel batteries in front, on which the enemy were also standing and gazing listlessly at us. They were only 300 yards off, and it really looked as if we could have thrown stones at each other. On our ramparts was proudly floating the good old flag, and right in our teeth the Confederate rag. The first coup d'oeil, as the whole scene burst upon me—with the little intervening ravine, the calm river, and wooded shore beyond—was one never to be forgotten.

"On inquiring how it was that the enemy did not fire at us, or we at them? the soldiers told me that, by some tacit understanding among themselves, the two sides had ceased worrying each other for days past. What the object of the rebels can be in permitting us undisturbed to erect such formidable works under their very noses passes the comprehension of every one.

"The large rebel battery near the river, and over which their flag is planted, is called the "Citadel," and is the highest and strongest work in Port Hudson. We are also on equally high ground,

and our battery quite as lofty as theirs, although it may not appear so in the picture, owing to the elevated point of view it was necessary to select for seeing the surrounding country.

"Although not playing on our breast-works, the rebels—while I was busily sketching—fired several times down the ravine toward the river, at the negroes who were still busy in the lower intrenchments. In spite of all I had heard of this 'tacit understanding' between us and them, their music was unpleasantly near and suggestive. When these two batteries open in earnest their thunder against each other the struggle will be terrific."

OUR MILITIA AT CARLISLE.

WE publish on page 477 an illustration of the SHELLING OF THE TOWN OF CARLISLE, PENNSYLVANIA, BY THE REBELS, from a sketch by our special artist Mr. Thomas Nast. Our militia, comprising, among other regiments, the 22d and 37th, both from this city, marched from Harrisburg on 30th June, and arrived at Carlisle next morning, after some skirmishing with the rebels. That evening the rebel commander sent three several summonses to the commanding officer at Carlisle, demanding a surrender; but old General Smith had no notion of the kind, and refused in terms more peremptory than polite. The rebels then, at 10 P.m., began to shell the place. Our troops were partly in Main Street and partly in the outskirts of the town, lying quiet in the dark, unable to reply and exposed to the shells. Yet not a man wavered or skulked; and by good Providence no one was killed, though some were slightly wounded by contusions. Next morning our boys moved, and the rebels skedaddled.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

Diary of the

American Revolution.

By Frank Moore,

Editor of the "Rebellion Record."

One Volume, Large 8vo, 1100 pages. Illustrated with 12
Steel Plates. $3.50.

Published exclusively for Subscribers.

AGENTS WANTED!!!

Address, for terms, &c., the Publisher,

CHARLES T. EVANS, 448 Broadway, N. Y.

MUSQUITO ALL NETS.

MuSQUITO NEW NETS.

MUSQUITO KINDS NETS.

MUSQUITO of NETS.

MUSQUITO PATENT SHIELDS.

MUSQUITO CANOPIES   SHIELDS.

MUSQUITO SHIELDS.

Lace At Kelty's Curtains.

LACE   No. 359 Broadway.   CURTAINS.

LACE   CURTAINS.

Holland & Gold Window Shades

HOLLAND and GOLD WINDOW SHADES.

HOLLAND and GOLD WINDOW SHADES.

Surgeon-General Hammond,

By ordering Calomel and destructive minerals from the supply tables, has conferred a blessing on our sick soldiers. Let him not stop here. Let him order the discontinuance of "Bleeding," and the use of BRANDRETH'S PILLS in the place thereof. Then will commence a "new era" in the practice of Medicine, which would then become emphatically

THE HEALING ART.

I have for thirty years taught that no diseased action could be cured by mercury or tartar emetic. That the human body could only be "made whole" by "vegetable food"—animal food being, in fact, condensed vegetables. BRANDRETH'S PILLS should be in every Military Hospital. These Pills cure BILIOUS DIARRHOEA, CHRONIC DIARRHOEA, CHRONIC DYSENTERY, and all Fevers and Affections of the Bowels, sooner and more suely than any medicine in the world. BRANDRETH'S PILLS in these cases should be taken night and morning. Read Directions and get new style.

CASE OF ROSCOE K. WATSON.

Dr. B. Brandreth—

New York:

SIR: I was a private in Co. F, 17th regiment, New York Vols. While at Harrison's Landing and on the Rappahannock near Falmouth, I and many of the Company were sick with bilious diarrhoea. The Army Surgeon did not cure us, and I was reduced to skin and bone. Among the Company were quite a number of members who had worked in your Laboratory at Sing Sing. They were not sick, because they used Brandreth's Pills. These men prevailed upon me and others to use the Pills, and we were all cured in from two to five days. After this our boys used Brandreth's Pills for the typhus fever, colds, and rheumatism, and in no case did they fail to restore health.

Out of gratitude to you for my good health, I send you this letter, which, if necessary, the entire Company would sign.

I am, respectfully yours,

ROSCOE K. WATSON,

JUNE 23, 1863.   Sing Sing.

SOLD AT NO. 4 UNION SQUARE, and by all respectable dealers.

PRINCIPAL OFFICE NO. 294 CANAL ST.

The Ladies' Gem $5 Sewing Machine.

Sent free on receipt of price. Great inducements to Agents. For particulars, specimens of sewing, &c., send stamp for return postage. Address

A. PALMER, No. 41 Green Street, New York City.

"THE PORTRAIT MONTHLY,"
PART I.—NOW READY.
Price 10 Cents.

"THE PORTRAIT MONTHLY," comprising sixteen quarto pages, is published on the 15th of every month. Each number will contain some

THIRTY PORTRAITS

OF THE

MOST PROMINENT PERSONS OF THE DAY!

With carefully prepared and authentic Biographies. Specimen Copies 10 Cents each, to be found at the News Depots. Subscription Price $1 per annum. The NEW YORK ILLUSTRATED NEWS and "THE PORTRAIT MONTHLY," together, furnished to Subscribers at $4 per year. Published by THOS. B. LEGGETT & CO., 90 Beekman Street, New York.

J. W. EVERETT & CO., METROPOLITAN

PURCHASING AGENCY, 111 Fulton Street, or P. O. Box 1,614 NEW YORK CITY.

We will also forward to any address, on receipt of order (accompanied by cash), ANY ARTICLE REQUIRED, at the LOWEST PRICES; Photographs, Albums, Latest Publications, Music, Jewelry, Books, Playing Cards, Army Corps Badges, or any other articles procurable in this city.

We will forward, on receipt of 25 cents each, Photographs of GENERALS MEADE, M'CLELLAN, GRANT, FREMONT, ROSECRANS, SIGEL, BANKS, SHERMAN, HALLECK, SLOCUM, SICKLES; ADMIRALS PORTER, FOOTE, DUPONT, or any of the leading OFFICERS IN THE ARMY AND NAVY.

Harper's Hand-Book

FOR

Travellers in Europe and the East.

Being a Guide through France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Austria, Italy, Sicily, Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Greece, Switzerland, Tyrol, Russia, Denmark, Sweden, Spain, and Great Britain and Ireland. By W. PEMBROKE FETRIDGE. With a Map embracing Colored Routes of Travel in the above countries, and a new Railroad Map. Revised and Enlarged Edition. Large 12mo, Cloth, $3.00; Leather Tucks, $3.50. The object of this work is to give a distinct and clear outline of tours through the principal cities in Europe, to give the cost of travelling the different routes, the names of the best hotels, the principal "Sights" and Works of Art in the leading cities, the fees expected by custodians, &c. By a careful attention to the rules laid down, the traveller will find himself the gainer by fifty per cent.

The remarkable success of Harper's Hand-Book, first published last year has fully realized the expectations of the publishers, the instance being very rare where a traveller has crossed the Atlantic without a copy in his possession. The reason is evident, as this is the only Guide-Book published in the United States, and the only complete one in a single volume in the English language. The entire work is revised by the author, who went to Europe for that purpose.

Those who have visited Europe, as well as those unable to go, will each and all derive much information from a perusal of this useful work.

Published by HARPER & BROTHERS, New York.

Sent by mail, postage free, to any part of the United States, on receipt of $3.50.

HARPER'S

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE

For August, 1863.

CONTENTS:

SCENES IN THE WAR OF 1812.—III. HARRISON AND PERRY.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—Put-in-Bay.—Green Clay.—Ruins of Fort Miami.—Peter Navarre.—Turkey Point.—Leslie Combs.—View from Maumee City.—George Croghan.—Site of Fort Stephenson.—Perry's Head-Quarters.—Oliver H. Perry.—Stephen Champlin.—The Burial-Place.—Perry's Statue.—Isaac Shelby. —Dolsen's.—View on the Thames.—Johnson's Monument.—Battle-Ground of the Thames.—Harrison's Tomb.

AN AMERICAN FAMILY IN GERMANY. (Concluded.) ILLUSTRATIONS.—Nicholas.—Street Musicians.—Christmas-Tree.—Der Gemuthlich—Village Festival.—Peasant Family going Home.—A Climax on Ice.—Falling in Love.—Letters from America. EULALIE. CEMETERIES. THE BATTLE AND TRIUMPH OF DR. SUSAN. PART I. SIR GUY OF BRITTANY.

"MY HEART AND I."

ROMOLA. By the Author of "ADAM BEDE." CHAPTER LVII. Why Tito was Safe. CHAPTER LVIII. A final Understanding. CHAPTER LIX. Pleading. CHAPTER LX. The Scaffold. CHAPTER LXI. Drifting away.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—The old Palace.—Drifting away. THE SMALL HOUSE AT ALLINGTON. CHAPTER XXVIII. The Board. CHAPTER XXIX. John Eames returns to Burton Crescent. CHAPTER XXX. Is it from him? ILLUSTRATIONS.—Before the Club-House.—The Board. MAKING A WILL.

OUR CONTRABAND. ARTIST—PHILOSOPHER—LOVER. CAPTAIN CHARLEY. THE EMPRESS EUGENIE.

MONTHLY RECORD OF CURRENT EVENTS. LITERARY NOTICES. EDITOR'S EASY CHAIR. EDITOR'S DRAWER. FOURTH OF JULY EXPERIENCES OF THE BRITISH LION.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—Sets out for a Walk.—Assailed by Young America.—More Scared than Hurt.—Pounced upon by the Eagle.—Forced to hear an Oration.—Taken to Dinner.—Gets Elevated.—Treated to a Bath.—Set up as a Target.—Sent up Sky high.—Blown up.—The Lion at 11 P.M.

FASHIONS FOR AUGUST.

   ILLUSTRATIONS.—Home Toilet, Figure 1.—Home Toilet, Figure 2.

TERMS.

One Copy for one Year . . . . . . . $3.00

Two Copies for One Year . . . . . . 5.00

An Extra Copy, gratis, for every Club of TEN SUBSCRIBERS, at $2.50 each, or 11 Copies for $25.00.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $5.00.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS.

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