Explosion at Fort Moultrie

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, October 3, 1863

Welcome to our archive of original Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers. Browse through these papers and read incredible details and view impressive illustrations, all created by eye-witnesses to the events. These details are simply not available anywhere else.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Charleston

Battle of Charleston

poetry

Poetry

Battle of Chattanooga

Fort Wagner

Assault on Fort Wagner

Explosion at Fort Moultrie

Harbor Obstruction

Harbor Obstruction

Georgia

Georgia Battle Map

Battle at Raccoon Ford

Sword Presentation to General Meade

Sword Presentation to General Meade

Osliaba

Russian Frigate Osliaba

Britannia Cartoon

Britannia Cartoon

Battle of Raccoon Ford

Battle of Raccoon Ford

 

 

 

OCTOBER 3, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

629

CHARLESTON.

WE continue in this number our series of illustrations of General Gilmore's campaign before Charleston, from sketches by our special artist, Mr. T. R. Davis. Mr. Davis writes:

"REPULSE AT GREGG.

"HEAD-QUARTERS, MORRIS ISLAND, Sept. 15,1863.

"The attempt to capture Battery Gregg by boat attack, though a failure, hastened, without doubt, the conge taken by the rebels of Morris Island on the night of the 6th ult.

"This I premise, that the real importance of the event may be more perfectly understood, and the daring exhibited in the attempt, though unsuccessful, may be more thoroughly appreciated.

"The scene upon the beach when, just at twilight, the boats that were to bear our gallant men upon their dangerous mission were being transported upon wagons to a point from whence a successful starting could be accomplished was full of suggestion. Would they be successful; or would the same boats be on the morrow shattered wrecks, each splinter stained with blood, telling of the sacrifice freely offered for our country's Union?

"Then waiting with more than eager eye and breathless anxiety stood to their guns the brave men, who watched from the different batteries for the first flash that would tell of a successful landing, or the discovery by an alert foe.

"Could we have captured Battery Gregg a few more of the 'Tchivulree' would now be at Hilton Head, awaiting their transportation to the land of 'Unculpsalm.'

"MOULTRIE.

"The sketch of Fort Moultrie and the batteries upon Sullivan's Island gives the scene which was witnessed by the sturdy Jack Tars who manned our iron-clads in their last attack upon these works, and which was hailed by them with cheer after cheer.

"The Weehawken had just grounded upon a shoal near Morris Island, and the concentrated

THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON—SOLDIERS EXPLODING TORPEDOES BY THROWING PIECES OF SHELL ON THEM FROM THE SAPS.
[FROM A SKETCH BY MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

fire of the rebel batteries was being hurled against her, when, by is fortunate accident, a shell from one of her monster guns blew up the magazine of Fort Moultrie. Just at this time, too, Moultrieville was in flames, the smoke hanging in grand masses over the angry scene.

"THE HEAD OF THE SAP AGAINST WAGNER.

"Words seem to fail me as I pen the account of this scene. The General had said, 'The head of the sap must be in the ditch of Wagner ere morning, that our men may enter and carry the fort from it.' The desperate labor of long weeks was nearly ended. Foot by foot our flag, advanced by its sturdy bearer, neared the rebel strong-hold. A brilliant glare from the calcium light, flooding Wagner, gave us the advantage of seeing without being seen. Just as the 'sap roller,' a huge 'gabion' (or basket) filled with 'fascines' (bundles of fagots), had reached the ditch, a deserter came to us telling of the rebel flight.

"A word may here be said of the splendid work performed in these saps by engineer officers. Lieut. M'Guire, after finishing the labor assigned to him upon the Left Batteries, was put upon the work of the sap, and the exceeding ability and gallantry displayed by him will not soon be forgotten by those who took part in the capture of Morris Island. He is now intrusted with the important work of rendering Battery Gregg all that a sand-work can be, and a sore place for the Charlestonians to look upon, as they are soon to discover. Captains Siess and Walker, too, are in every way worthy of the public's commendation.

"REBEL TORPEDOES.

"In traveling through the saps one often enjoys a quiet laugh at the manner in which the soldiers are amusing themselves. A few days since, having nearly reached Battery Wagner, I heard in a sap near some of the boys calling, "That's going to hit it; look out, boys!' and the next moment an explosion that shook (Next Page)

THE SIEGE OF CHARLESTON—EXPLOSION OF THE MAGAZINE AT FORT MOULTRIE.—[FROM A SKETCH BY MR. THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

Exploding Torpedoes
Fort Moultrie

 

 

 

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