Soldier Shooting from Behind a Dead Horse

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, October 10, 1863

This site features our collection of Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers. Harper's Weekly was the most popular illustrated newspapers of the day. Our online version of this historical record will help students of the war find in depth information and incredible illustrations of all the key events in the War.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

General Thomas

General Thomas

Battle of Chickamauga

Battle of Chickamauga

Bread Riots

Mobile Bread Riots

Artillery Shells

Artillery Shells

Sabine Pass

Battle of Sabine Pass

Sabine Pass

Sabine Pass

Dead Horse

Soldier with a Dead Horse

Slave Cartoon

Slave Cartoon

Black Island Batteries

Black Island Batteries

Army of the Potomac

Army of the Potomac

 

 

 

 

 

 

OCTOBER, 10, 1863.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

653

THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC—SHARP-SHOOTER IMPROVISING A REST FOR HIS RIFLE.—SKETCHED BY A. R. WAUD.—[SEE PAGE 646.]

(Previous Page) he dispatched General Shackelford, with his brigade, on the 5th, from Knoxville, with instructions to seize all avenues of escape to the South. He followed himself, with another body of infantry and cavalry, on the 7th, and arrived within four miles of the Gap on the 9th, after a forced march of sixty miles. De Courcy and Shackelford

had both made demands for surrender, which General Frazier declined. Upon his arrival, General Burnside renewed it, when the rebel commander offered to surrender upon condition that his officers and men were paroled. An unconditional surrender being insisted upon, he yielded. His force consisted of the Second North Carolina, First

Virginia, First Georgia regiments, and several companies of artillery. The Georgia regiment was eight hundred strong, and was once before captured by General Burnside, at Roanoke Island. The prisoners are now on their way North. In explanation of the extraordinary isolation General Frazier was left in, rebel officers asserted that General

Bragg had peremptorily ordered him to remain. On the night of the 7th two companies of our troops stole their way through the rebel pickets and burned a mill that had supplied the rebels with meal in the very sight of the enemy's camp. This neat performance helped much to hasten the surrender.

THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC—THE BEDOUIN TENT.—SKETCHED BY A. R. WAUD.—[SEE PAGE 646.]

Soldier Shooting Behind Dead Horse
Tent

 

 

 

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