Sherman's March into Marietta Georgia

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, August 13, 1864

This site features our extensive collection of Harper's Weekly newspaper. It took us over 20 years to compile collection, and we are proud to make it available online. These old newspapers will enable you to develop a more complete understanding of the Civil War.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

McPherson

General McPherson

Slavery

Slavery Editorial

Petersburg Mine

Petersburg Explosion

Pennsylvania

Second Pennsylvania

General McPherson

General McPherson

General Howard

General Howard

Sherman Marietta Georgia

Sherman's March into Marietta

Dutch

Dutch Farmer Cartoon

Petersburg

Siege of Petersburg

Sherman Georgia

Sherman's March Through Georgia

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUGUST 13, 1864.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

525

GENERAL SHERMAN'S ADVANCE—VIEW OF THE MILITARY COLLEGE NEAR MARIETTA, GEORGIA.—[SKETCHED BY THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

COLONEL BROWNLOW ON A PICKET HUNT.--[SKETCHED BY THEODORE R. DAVIS.]

GEN. SHERMAN'S ADVANCE.

ON this and the preceding, as well as on our first page, we continue our illustrations of General SHERMAN'S great campaign. One of these, on page 524, represents THE FOURTH CORPS—General HOWARD'S-CROSSING THE CHATTAHOOCHEE. This corps was one of the last to cross; it reached the Atlanta side without opposition, taking its position in the centre of SHERMAN'S lines after crossing the river.

TURNER'S MILL, illustrated on the same page, is on Nickajack Creek, which is an affluent of the Chattahoochee, from the northern side, emptying into that river a little above Sandtown. It was near its mouth that the rebel army made its last stand before crossing the Chattahoochee. The illustration is chiefly valuable for its rural rather than its military feature.

Another pleasant scene, which we give our readers on the same page, is that representing the soldiers engaged in setting Fish-traps in the Chattahoochee.

On this page we give a view of the MILITARY COLLEGE near Marietta, formerly one of the first in the South. The area, as seen in the sketch, is filled with rebel prisoners.

Another illustration on this page represents Colonel JIM BROWNLOW, with a small party of men in Georgia costume , crossing the Chattahoochee to capture the rebel pickets. The expedition was a successful one, but it broke up the friendly communication which had been several days established between the picket, across the river. This was before SHERMAN had crossed. The morning after the occurrence notice was given of the changed situation by a Reb yelling out across the stream:

"Hello, Yank !"

" What do you want, Johnny ?"

"Can't talk to you 'uns any more!"

"How is that ?"

" Orders to dry up !"

" What for, Johnny?"

"Oh ! JIM BROWNLOW, with his d—d Tennessee Yanks, swam over upon the left last night, and stormed our rifle-pits naked—captured sixty of our boys, and made 'em swim back with him. We'uns

have got to keep you 'uns on your side of the river now."

More interesting, as connected with later and more stirring events, is the illustration given on our first page representing General HOOKER riding along his lines on the morning after the great bat-

tle of the 20th. This battle was very severe. The rebels, by their own account, lost over 5000 men, while our loss was less than one-third of that number. The attack was made by the enemy shortly after our troops had crossed Peach - tree Creek. NEWTON'S division of HOWARD'S corps had found time to protect elf by a slight rail-barricade. HOOKER was attacked while yet in column, his "family," as he calls the Twentieth Corps, getting into order almost without an order. The heaviest attack fell on General WILLIAMS'S division. WARD'S and BUTTERFIELD'S divisions were more successful. They had for trophies seven rebel flags. When HOOKER rode along the lines the next morning, as represented in the sketch, to greet his troops and to congratulate them on their success, these flags were all brought out for his inspection, the men being engaged in burying the rebel dead lying thickly around.

We also give on this page portraits of General A. S. WILLIAMS and of the late General HARKER. Brigadier-General CHARLES G. HARKER, killed in the assault on Kenesaw, June 27, was a native of New Jersey. He entered West Point in 1854, at the age of seventeen. He entered the regular army as Brevet Second Lieutenant .of the Second Infantry July 1, 1858. He was made First Lieutenant of the Ninth May 14, 1861, and a Captain in October of that year. He entered the war as Lieutenant-Colonel of the Sixty-fifth Ohio Volunteers in the fall of 1861, and afterward became its Colonel. Be participated in the battle of Shiloh and the siege of Corinth, and helped chase BRAGG out of Kentucky, being then in command of a brigade. His brigade joined General ROSECRANS'S Army of the Cumberland. In the official report of the battle at Stone River he was recommended for promotion, which he only received last April, when he was made a Brigadier-General of Volunteers. He was under THOMAS when the latter made his gallant stand at Chickamauga.

THE LATE BRIGADIER-GENERAL CHARLES G, HARKER.--[PHOTOGRAPHED BY MORSE, NASHVILLE, TENN.]

BRIGADIER GENERAL A. S. WILLIAMS.—[PHOTOGRAPHED BY MORSE, NASHVILLE, TENN.]

Sherman in Marietta, Georgia
Soldiers Crossing River
General Harker
General Williams

 

 

  

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