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Civil War Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864

This site features online versions of all the Harper's Weekly newspapers printed during the Civil War. These papers are an excellent resource for the serious student of the Civil War. The illustrations were made by war correspondents deployed with the troops on the front lines.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Christmas Morning

Christmas Morning

Arming Slaves

Arming Slaves

Sherman Reaches Savannah

Sherman Reaches Savannah

Destroying Railroads

Troops Destroying Railroads

Jarret's Depot

Battle of Jarret's Station

Army of the Cumberland

Army of the Cumberland

Nesho

Monitor Neosho

Dresses

Civil War Dresses

Burning Railroads

Troops Burning Railroads

Union Christmas Dinner

Abraham Lincoln and the Union Christmas Dinner

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HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[DECEMBER 31, 1864.

844

ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND--NASHVILLE AND ITS FORTIFICATIONS.

(Previous Page) WILSON'S cavalry in the mean while advanced until it rested on the hills six miles from Nashville. A new line was formed, and our forces were ready for the attack on this by 5 P.M. The charge was made in the face of a fire which would have been intolerable if the rebels had not fired too high ; but when the works were reached their defenders fled in confusion, leaving their cannon and many prisoners behind them. It was now too late to pursue the advantage. The day's work was over, and THOMAS had to show for it long lines of intrenchments captured from the enemy, sixteen guns, and over a thousand prisoners.

The next day brought still more glorious results. WILSON'S cavalry turned the left of their new line and captured many prisoners. SCHOFIELD carried several hills, capturing six guns and many prisoners, SMITH carried the salient point of the enemy's line, capturing sixteen guns, two Brigadier Generals, and about two thousand prisoners. This with one of his divisions : the other GARRARD'S captured the intrenchments in its front, with all the artillery and troops left in them. WOOD, next, on the left, took up the assault, carrying intrenchments, with eight guns and six hundred prisoners. In the mean time General R. W. JOHNSON, in co-

operation with the gun-boats. drove the rebels from their batteries below Nashville, capturing a large number of prisoners. All day HOOD had been falling back, having during the previous night with drawn his right and taken up a position covering his line of retreat on Franklin.

On the 17th HOOD was pressed beyond Franklin, where he left behind him 1500 wounded. His front. and flanks were infested with perpetual attack. While passing through Franklin KNIPE'S cavalry division captured five battle flags and 250 prisoners. JOHNSON struck his flank beyond Franklin, capturing a large number of prisoners.

PARIS FASHIONS FOR DECEMBER.

A COMPLETE revolution seems to have taken place in the modes during the past twelvemonth. Such strange and such curious costumes have rarely been seen in so short an interval, during which ladies perfectly comme il faut have alternately, not to say sometimes simultaneously, patronized boots, coats, canes, and casquettes, without, after all, sacrificing any of their personal attractions, which, fortunately, they can not abdicate by any fashion freak. The latest sign of this closing season of artifice is the open announcement, by the principal (Next Page)

THE UNITED STATES MONITOR "NEOSHO" ENGAGING THREE REBEL BATTERIES ON THE CUMBERLAND, BELOW NASHVILLE, DEC. 6, 1864.[SKETCHED BY ROHR.]

Nashville
Monitor Neosho

 

 

  

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