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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 23, 1864

Welcome to our online collection of original Harper's Weekly newspapers. We have put this collection together over the last 20 years, and now make them available for your study and research online. We hope you find this resource useful, and hope you will check back often as we add new material each day.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Alabama Sinking

Destruction of the "Alabama"

Kenesaw

Capture of Kenesaw Mountain

Port Walthall

Port Walthall

Meade

General Meade and Staff

Crash

Train Crash

Humor

Humor

Semmes Cartoon

Semmes Cartoon

Pennsylvania Map

Pennsylvania Map

Scenes Around Petersburg

Marietta

Battle Marietta Georgia

 

 

 

 

JULY 23, 1864.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

477

CAPTAIN JOHN A. WINSLOW, OF THE "KEARSARGE."
[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BLACK, BOSTON.]

GENERAL SHERMAN'S CAMPAIGN.

ON page 476 we give two sketches illustrating SHERMAN'S movements to the right of Kenesaw Mountain. One of these, representing the REBEL CHARGE ON OUR RIGHT NEAR MARIETTA, relates to the battle of Culp's Farm, four miles west of Marietta, June 22. SCHOFIELD held the extreme right; on his left, HOOKER commanded the Marietta Road; HOWARD held the centre; and PALMER and M'PHERSON extended the Federal lines to Brush Mountain, on the railroad. Nearly all day the rebels engaged HOWARD, to divert attention from the right, where they were massing troops on the Marietta Road against HOOKER. A furious attack was made at this point at five P.M. The following troops were engaged : WILLIAMS'S division on the right, GEARY'S in the centre, and BUTTERFIELD'S on the left; General KNIPE's and RUGER'S brigades formed a second line on the right. An attempt was made to flank HOOKER'S right, but this was prevented by the Fourteenth Kentucky, from SCHOFIELD'S corps. Soon SCHOFIELD'S main body pressed up, and the rebels were driven in great disorder.

The other cut shows the ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND SWINGING AROUND THE KENESAW MOUNTAIN on the right, in order to flank the position.

The Kenesaw Mountain has two elevations, one about 900 and the other 800 feet high. The base of the mountain extends about four miles from east to west.

CAPTAIN WINSLOW AND THE
PIRATE SEMMES.

ON this page we give the portraits of Captain JOHN A. WINSLOW, of the Kearserge, and of Captain RAPHAEL SEMMES, late of the Alabama. The portrait of the latter is from a photograph taken by A. DUPERTZ, in Jamaica, January, 1863.

Captain WINSLOW was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1811. His father was a Northerner, descended from the old Plymouth stock of WINSLOW'S ; his mother was a Southerner. He was educated at Dedham, Massachusetts, and entered the navy as midshipman at the age of fourteen. DANIEL WEBSTER secured for him this position. His family reside at Roxbury, near Boston. He was placed in command of the Kearsarge as soon as that vessel arrived off the European coast. Before his conflict with the Alabama he had some apprehensions, and repeatedly advised the Naval Department to increase the force off Cherbourg, but said he would do the best he could. Upon the receipt of a vote of thanks from Congress he will be made a Commodore.

Captain RAPHAEL SEMMES, formerly an officer of our navy, was, early in the war, appointed by the rebel Government to take com-

THE PIRATE RAPHAEL SEMMES.
[PHOTOGRAPHED IN 1863 BY A. DUPERTZ, KINGSTON, JAMAICA.]

mand of the Sumter, which ran out of New Orleans in July, 1861. This vessel, after burning several prizes, reached Cadiz the following February. Here she was blockaded by the Tascarora, until SEMMES, despairing of escape, sold her. When the Alabama had managed to escape from England SEMMES became her captain. He held this position nearly two years, capturing and burning American vessels, until at last, blocked in at Cherbourg, as the Sumter had been at Cadiz, the Alabama came out and fought the Kearsarge and was sunk.

THE TERRIBLE RAILWAY
DISASTER IN CANADA.

IT is not often that we have to record a disaster more affecting than that which happened to the German emigrant train on the Grand Trunk Railway in Canada at the end of June, and which is illustrated on this page, from a photograph sent us by A. BAZINET & Co., of Montreal. The accident happened near Montreal, at Belaeil Bridge. The passengers consisted mostly of emigrants from Bohemia, Poland, Saxony, Sweden, and Norway, five hundred and thirty souls in all, who had just arrived from Hamburg in the Neckar, which sailed from that port May 18. Some of them intended to settle in Upper Canada, and others in the United States. They presented a very respectable appearance; for the most part they were grouped in families, there being but few single men in the company; and generally they appeared to be well provided with means. Fortunately eighty were compelled to remain behind at Quebec, because they had not means. Altogether, there were eight hundred and thirty-five that took the train from Point Levi. It was a night-train, and the night was clear and pleasant. When the train reached the bridge, at 1.15 A.M., the draw was open to allow some barges to pass through to Lake Champlain. The usual red danger-light was burning, and could be seen at a distance of 540 yards. The signal was not regarded, and the train rushed on, falling into the river 40 feet, car after car, on the deck of one of the barges. First came the locomotive, sinking the barge, then the tender, capsizing upon the locomotive, followed by the baggage-car, which fell flat into the draw. Above all these, in the most utter confusion, came the passenger-cars. Only one of these was fitted with seats, and was curiously delivered on top of the barge's deck, having pretty effectually shaken up its inmates. The other cars were piled one above another, crushed into an indiscriminate mass of splinters and iron; the car-wheels, the bundles of the passengers, and their bruised bodies, were not huddled together, but mixed up, confused with one another. One hundred were wounded and ninety were killed. The removal of the debris, says the Montreal Gazette, "revealed a (Next Page)

THE GREAT RAILWAY DISASTER NEAR MONTREAL, CANADA.
[PHOTOGRAPHED BY A. BAZINET & Co., MONTREAL

John Winslow
Raphael Semmes
Train Crash

 

 

  

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