General Wadsworth

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 21, 1864

We are happy to present this online archive of our collection of Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers. Reading these original newspapers enables you to gain new insights into the important people, events, and battles of the Civil War. We have posted over 2,000 pages, and hope you find the material useful.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Buzzard's Roost

Buzzard's Roost

Harper's Endorses Lincoln

Spotsylvania

Battle of Spotsylvania

Virginia Map

Richmond

Richmond Battle Map

Wadsworth

General Wadsworth

Atrocities

Confederate Atrocities

Ads

Music Festival

Philadelphia Music Festival

City Point Virginia

Atrocities

Atrocities

 

 

 

 

MAY 21, 1864.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

333

GEN. JAMES S. WADSWORTH.

GENERAL JAMES S. WADSWORTH, who fell at the head of his command in the battle of the 6th inst., in the Wilderness, beyond the Rapidan, was one of the first volunteers of the war. His first service in the field was under McDOWELL at Bull Run. About the 1st of August, 1861, he was commissioned a Brigadier-General ; and during the long drilling months which succeeded General McCLELLAN'S appointment to the command-in-chief General WADSWORTH won for himself the credit, among the most experienced army officers, of having his brigade, long before the close of the year, in the most efficient condition alike as to drill and discipline. In the spring of 1862 General WADSWORTH was appointed Military Governor of the District of Columbia ; and on the advance of General McCLELLAN to Manassas, and subsequently to the Peninsula, General WADSWORTH'S command extended to Occoquan Bay. In the winter of 1862-3, after his defeat as candidate for Governor of New York, he passed several months in the field, and was engaged at the battle of Chancellorsville. He was charged later in the season with a mission to the Southwest and the Gulf States, in connection with the organization of colored troops; and his latest position was that of General of the Fourth Division of the Fifth Corps. He gave his sons as well as himself to the service of his country, and used his large means with the utmost liberality to aid the national cause. He was nearly fifty-seven years of age.

DESTRUCTION OF EAST TENNESSEE RAILROAD.

WE give on this page a sketch of the incident referred to in the following letter from a correspondent at Bull's Gap, Tennessee : " The First Brigade of the Third Division of the Twenty-third Army Corps started from camp on the morning of the 25th inst. to destroy the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, and returned last evening, having

torn up the road for fifteen miles between Lick Creek and Greenville, burning every bridge and railroad tie, and bending every rail, so completely destroying the road that it can not be repaired in months. The Second Brigade left on Sunday morning to destroy the railroad bridge over Watauga River, fifty-four miles distant. The force had a fight with the enemy under 'MUDWALL' JACKSON, completely routing him, and on their way back burned all bridges and tore up the entire track. The sketch sent you was takenon the spot."

DESTRUCTION OF SCHOONERS
OFF HOMOSASSA RIVER.

WE give below a sketch of the DESTRUCTION OF Two REBEL SCHOONERS OFF HOMOSASSA RIVER, FLORIDA, by a boat's crew from the United States strainer Sagamore. A correspondent on board the Sagamore sends us the following account of the affair : " About three o'clock on the after-noon of April 1 we saw a schooner making in for one of the rivers to the southward of Cedar Keys, and immediately gave chase with the steamer; but soon shoaled our water so much that we had to conic to anchor and send off boats. One boat soon distanced the others, finding two schooners instead of one. The crews of both had run them ashore and taken boats for Dixie. Our boats' crew soon had good fires going on both of them. The first one boarded was a 150-ton schooner with an assorted cargo, the other was a 70-ton schooner loaded with castor-oil and poor whisky."

GEN. SHERMAN'S ADVANCE.

THE view of BUZZARD'S ROOST, which we give on the first page, from a sketch made by THEO, R. DAVIS, is of particular interest at this time. Buzzard's Roost is a gap in Taylor's Ridge, which runs parallel with Pigeon Mountain, and is situated (Next Page)

THE LATE GENERAL WADSWORTH.

DESTRUCTION OF THE EAST TENNESSEE AND VIRGINIA RAILROAD.

DESTRUCTION OF REBEL SCHOONERS OFF HOMOSASSA RIVER, FLORIDA.

General Wadsworth
Destruction of Railroad
Destruction of Ships

 

 

  

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