Colonel Alexander Gardiner

 

This Site:

Civil War

Civil War Overview

Civil War 1861

Civil War 1862

Civil War 1863

Civil War 1864

Civil War 1865

Civil War Battles

Confederate Generals

Union Generals

Confederate History

Robert E. Lee

Civil War Medicine

Lincoln Assassination

Slavery

Site Search

Civil War Links

 

Civil War Art

Mexican War

Republic of Texas

Indians

Winslow Homer

Thomas Nast

Mathew Brady

Western Art

Civil War Gifts

Robert E. Lee Portrait


Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 5, 1864

Welcome to our collection of Civil War newspapers. These Harper's Weekly papers were published within days of the battles and events depicted. The wood cut illustrations were created by war correspondents on the front lines, creating eye-witnesses drawings of the critical events of the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Sheridan's Ride

Sheridan's Ride to the Front

Ride

Sheridan's Ride

Battle of Cedar Creek

Battle of Cedar Creek

Adams Express

Adams Express Office

Adams Express Banking

Colonel Gardiner

Trench Warfare

Trench Warfare

Colored Regiment

Colored Regiment

Refugees

Civil War Refugees

Petersburg

 

 

 

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[NOVEMBER 5, 1864.

716

THE LATE COLONEL ALEXANDER GARDINER.

THE LATE COLONEL GARDINER.

COLONEL ALEXANDER GARDINER, of the Fourteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, whose portrait is engraved on this page, was a native of New York City. Shortly after being admitted to the bar he removed to Kansas, then in her darkest hours of trouble, taking with him a printing-press and materials for the establishment of a Free State paper. But Lawrence was sacked and his press utterly destroyed before the issue of the first number of the paper. Colonel GARDINER did not practice law in Kansas, as he refused to take oath under the pro-slavery Constitution. Having seen Kansas sub

stantially through her troubles, Colonel GARDINER removed to New Hampshire, and soon took a commanding position in his profession. He volunteered in the Fourteenth New Hampshire Volunteers, and was appointed Adjutant. After seeing service in Virginia the regiment went to New Orleans, when it was attached to the Nineteenth Corps, with which it returned to take part in the final struggle in Virginia. Adjutant GARDINER had been promoted to the command of the regiment, and was killed at its head while leading his men to the charge at the victorious battle of Winchester. The army may have lost more prominent officers, but none braver, nobler, truer.

THE LATE MAJOR JAMES P. JONES.---[SEE PAGE 717.]

Colonel Alexander Gardiner
Picture
James P. Jones

 

 

  

Site Copyright 2003-2014 Son of the South.  For Questions or comments about this collection, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

Privacy Policy

Are you Scared and Confused? Read My Snake Story, a story of hope and encouragement, to help you face your fears.