Hugh McCullough

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, March 25, 1865

This site features our complete collection of Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers. This online archive provides unique perspective on the war, and is full of interesting news items and incredible illustrations. This information allows the serious student or researcher to develop a deeper understanding of the important issues leading to and resulting from the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Hugh McCullough

Hugh McCullough

Sherman's March

Details of Sherman's March

Slave Conscription

Triumph

Triumph

James Harlan

James Harlan

Secrets

Keeping Secrets

Christian Commission

Christian Commission

Cardinal Wiseman

Cardinal Wiseman

Victory Parade

Victory Parade

Shenandoah Valley

General Sheridan Moving up the Shenandoah Valley

Ads

Ads

 

 

 

 

 

VOL. IX.—No. 430.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, MARCH 25, 1865.

[SINGLE COPIES TEN CENTS.

$4.00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1865, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


THE TRIUMPH IN NEW YORK.

THE grand triumph in New York on the 6th of March, after a weak fashion, reminds the scholar of those splendid triumphs which frequently glorified the streets of Imperial Romon the occasion of a great victory or series of victories. There were some important differences, however. Those triumphs were graced with the presence of the returning conqueror: but our GRANT and SHERMAN, after many important successes, are still in the field awaiting the consummation of the nation's triumph. The triumphs of ancient Rome were made glorious not alone by the trophies and spoils of war, but also, and mainly, by the spectacle of conquered generals borne as captives in the great procession: we displayed many trophies, but we are not at war with distant

provinces, but, unhappily, with our own brothers, whom we prefer to meet on equal terms and as brothers still—not as the victor meets the vanquished. So far there is nothing unfavorable in the comparison. But we very much doubt if a Roman triumph was ever degraded by mercenary trades-men, whose chief object in participating in the festival was the opportunity to advertise their wares.

In one respect—and that the most important of all—the gala-day in New York excelled all ancient triumphs. It was the people's festival. Our victories have all been gained in the interest of the people, and it was fitting that a million of hearts and faces should have responded to the demands of the occasion. The vast concourse of people thronging the streets and literally crowding every window and balcony along the long line of' the procession,

was the great feature of the day. It appears to us that the triumph was timely; it revived the patriotic pledges which New York city gave four years ago, that at whatever cost of blood or treasure the Union must be preserved ; and it was a foretaste of the happier, because completer, triumph that can not be far distant.

HON. HUGH McCULLOUGH, SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.

HUGH McCULLOUGH, appointed Secretary of the Treasury in place of WILLIAM PITT FESSENDEN, who resumes his seat in the Senate, is a native of Maine, though he has since 1833 resided in Indiana. Mr. McCULLOUGH received his collegiate education

at Bowdoin College, and then became a lawyer. In the spring of 1833 he settled at Fort Wayne, in Indiana, and two years afterward began his financial career as a banker. When the Indiana State bank was organized in 1855 he became its President, and remained in that position until May, 1863, when he was appointed Controller of the Currency at Washington. His politics had been those of the Whig party. His sentiments are in perfect accord with the Administration, and from the first indications that he has given of the policy which he intends to adopt as Treasurer we prognosticate for him a successful career. Upon the supposition of an early close of the war, Mr. McCullough is probably the most competent man who could have been selected. Even should the war be prolonged he possesses rare qualifications for the office.

HON. HUGH McCULLOUGH, SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.—[PHOTOGRAPHED BY GARDNER, WASHINGTON, D. C.]

Picture
Hugh McCullough

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $155.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net


 

 

  

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