Sinking of the Eliza Hancox

 

This Site:

Civil War

Civil War Overview

Civil War 1861

Civil War 1862

Civil War 1863

Civil War 1864

Civil War 1865

Civil War Battles

Confederate Generals

Union Generals

Confederate History

Robert E. Lee

Civil War Medicine

Lincoln Assassination

Slavery

Site Search

Civil War Links

 

Revolutionary War

Mexican War

Republic of Texas

Indians

Winslow Homer

Thomas Nast

Mathew Brady

Western Art

Civil War Gifts

Robert E. Lee Portrait


Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 21, 1865

This Harper's Weekly Newspaper was published during the Civil War, and is part of our extensive collection of historical documents. We are creating an online archive of this collection, to enable the serious student of the War a deeper and broader understanding of the key people, battles and events of the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Dutch Gap Canal

Dutch Gap Canal

Fall of Savannah

Savannah After the Fall

Roanoke

Roanoke Expedition

Battle of Wilmington

Battle of Wilmington

Building Canal

Building Dutch Gap Canal

Mosby Two Days

Two Days with Colonel Mosby

Otsego

Wreck of the Otsego

Eliza Hancox

Sinking of the Eliza Hancox

Newspaper Office

Newspaper Office

Savannah

Savannah

Slocum Revolver

Slocum's Revolver

 

 

 

 

 

JANUARY 21, 1865.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

45

MR. R. C. GRIDLEY AND HIS SACK OF FLOUR.—[PHOTOGRAPHED BY G. H. JOHNSON, SAN FRANCISCO.]

THE REBEL COLONEL JOHN S. MOSBY.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY REES, RICHMOND, VA.—[SEE PAGE 43.]

MR. GRIDLEY AND HIS SACK OF
FLOUR.

MR. R. C. GRIDLEY, of Austin, Nevada, has invented a new method of raising the wind. Whatever else may be thought of it, it is at least successful. An election was lately held in Austin for city officers, on the result of which many wagers were laid. Mr. GRIDLEY bet with Doctor HERRICK, the wager consisting of a sack of flour, which the unsuccessful better was to carry on his shoulders through the streets of the town, to the tune of John Brown. Mr. GRIDLEY, having lost, was on hand the morning after the election to fulfill his promise Preceded by a brass band and followed by a crowd,

he marched through the street with the flour sack, weighing 50 pounds, on his shoulders, amidst the shouts of the populace. After formally giving the flour into Doctor HERRICK'S hands he suggested that the latter should donate it to the Sanitary Commission. The suggestion was followed and the sack was put up at auction, and, after a spirited competition, sold for $350. It was again donated to the Commission, and was purchased by GRIDLEY, HOBART, and JACOBS for $250. The process was repeated over and over again until the sum of $6000 in gold had been realized. Starting for San Francisco with the sack Mr. GRIDLEY, in less than a month, had realized $63,000 in gold. No lady's album in Nevada or California is considered complete with-

out a photograph of GRIDLEY and his sack of flour. Mr. GRIDLEY, on December 13, left San Francisco, with his sack of flour, of course, for New York city, where fabulous sums are piled up, in anticipation of his arrival, for the benefit of the Sanitary Commission.

THE SOLE SURVIVOR OF A WRECK
RESCUED.

ON the 10th of December Colonel MULFORD'S dispatch boat, the Eliza Hancox, while on its way from Port Royal to Charleston, just as darkness was approaching, discovered off seaward a large fragment of a wreck. Upon making toward it

a human being was seen moving upon it, and endeavoring to attract attention to his perilous situation. A boat was lowered, and the man having been brought on board and warmed, told a most thrilling story of the wreck of which he was the sole survivor.

His name was JOHN R. CRUSE, and he had been a hand on the R. B. Howlett, of Philadelphia, which had been recently anchored in the channel way off Charleston, and used as a light ship. Her crew consisted of the captain, JAMES BREWER, the mate, A. H. DEAN, and four hands. The vessel had been wrecked the previous night. At first her anchor was broken through the force of the gale, and she began to drift toward the northern bar. It was not before she struck and went to pieces. DEAN having been bruised on the head by a plank when he was thrown into the water, survived only a short time.

THE ''ELIZA HANCOX" RESCUING THE SOLE SURVIVOR OF THE WRECK OF A LIGHT-SHIP OFF CHARLESTON, S. C.   

Mr. Gridley
Colonel John S. Mosby
Eliza Hancox

 

 

  

Site Copyright 2003-2014 Son of the South.  For Questions or comments about this collection, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net

Privacy Policy

Are you Scared and Confused? Read My Snake Story, a story of hope and encouragement, to help you face your fears.