The Battle of Santa Rosa Island

 

This Site:

Civil War

Civil War Overview

Civil War 1861

Civil War 1862

Civil War 1863

Civil War 1864

Civil War 1865

Civil War Battles

Confederate Generals

Union Generals

Confederate History

Robert E. Lee

Civil War Medicine

Lincoln Assassination

Slavery

Site Search

Civil War Links

 

Civil War Art

Revolutionary War

Mexican War

Republic of Texas

Indians

Winslow Homer

Thomas Nast

Mathew Brady

Western Art

Civil War Gifts

Robert E. Lee Portrait


Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 9, 1861

Below is an online version of the original Harper's Weekly newspaper for November 9, 1861. This newspaper features a variety of original Civil War content. Of particular interest is a large map of the Civil War, showing the various parts of the country at this time. The paper also has news stories on the important events of the war at this time.

(Scroll Down to see entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa Island

Poem

Poem for a Wounded Soldier

Naval Expedition

Naval Expedition

Mississippi River

Mississippi River Battle

Leesburg

Battle of Leesburg

Arkansas

Arkansas Troops

Lincoln Suspends Habeas Corpus

Lincoln Suspends Habeas Corpus

Plantation Slave

Plantation Slave Cartoon

The Battle of Edwards's Ferry

Shenandoah Valley

The Shenandoah Valley

Annapolis

Annapolis, Maryland

Civil War Map

Civil War Map of Southern States

 

 

VOL. V.—No. 254.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1861.

SINGLE COPIES SIX CENTS.

$2 50 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1861, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


CAPTAIN S. F. DUPONT COMMANDING THE GREAT NAVAL EXPEDITION. [PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

TO THE READER.

Subscribers should cut this Number open cautiously, in order not to spoil; the WAR MAP, which occupies four pages.

CAPTAIN DUPONT,

COMMANDING THE GREAT NAVAL EXPEDITION.

WE publish herewith a portrait of CAPTAIN S. F. DUPONT, the naval commander of the Great Expedition which sailed from Fortress Monroe last week for parts unknown. Captain Dupont is a native of New Jersey, but was appointed from Delaware, of which State he is a citizen. He entered the navy in 1815, and has consequently served his country for over forty-six years. In 1859 Captain Dupont was appointed Commandant of the Philadelphia Navy-yard—a position that he has held until recently. The Commodore's staff-officers are —Fleet-Captain, C. H. Davis; Flag-Lieutenant, S. W. Preston. His ship is the Wabash, 50 guns. He has lately been promoted to the command of that division of our fleet which has charge of the coast from Hatteras Inlet to Florida.

THE FIGHT ON SANTA ROSA
ISLAND.

WE illustrate on this page an incident of the fight of 9th October on Santa Rosa Island—the REMARKABLE ESCAPE OF MAJOR NEWBY, of the Sixth New York Volunteers. The whole affair is thus described

The fight occurred on the morning of October 9. The Zouave camp was situated on Santa Rosa Island, about one mile from Fort Pickens, and was so distributed as to command all the approaches to the fort, and also to protect the batteries. The rebel force, 1500 strong, embarked

from the Pensacola Navy-yard in three large steamers, and landed on the island, about four miles above the camp, Soon after 2 A.M. The night was very dark. The rebels rapidly formed in three columns, and proceeded silently toward the Zouave camp, hoping to Effect a total surprise. In this they were but partially successful. The picket guard, stationed about 600 yards from the camp, discovered and fired upon them. This gave the alarm, and saved the regiment from annihilation. The attack of the enemy's columns was simultaneous, and volley after volley was aimed at the volunteers, who were forced to fall back, leaving their camp in the hands of the rebels, which they immediately commenced burning. Fort Pickens was by this time thoroughly aroused, and three companies of regulars went to the assistance of the Zouaves. It was now our turn—the rebels commenced retreating to their boats, closely followed by the regulars and a small number of volunteers, keeping up a destructive fire upon them, killing and wounding a large number. The rebels finally succeeded in reaching their boats, but were not permitted to depart so easily. Their steamers were about five hundred yards from the beach, and our men poured volley upon volley into the crowded mass. Every bullet told, and from the shouts and utter confusion of the enemy it was clearly evident that we had obtained ample satisfaction. The regular soldiers behaved nobly, and great credit is due to Captains Robertson and Hildt, and Lieutenants Seely and Taylor, for the admirable coolness they displayed in maneuvering their respective commands. The volunteers were badly managed, and Colonel Wilson is very much censured for the inefficiency and want of skill displayed in the action. He did not arrive at the scene of action until all was over. The camp of the Sixth Regiment was almost totally destroyed, officers and men losing every thing.

Major Newby had a narrow escape from capture. He was confined to his bed dangerously ill at the time of the attack, and having been assisted to dress by his servants, was on the point of leaving his quarters, when the rebels charged up to the door. One of his servants was instantly killed, and the other taken prisoner ; the Major leveled his revolver and shot one of the rebels through the head, and then passing quickly out of the house, succeeded in mounting his horse, and rode safely through the storm of bullets showered upon him.

The Sixth Regiment lost ten killed, sixteen wounded, and nine prisoners. The regulars lost four killed, twenty wounded, and ten prisoners. The rebels lost, by their own statement, 350, killed, wounded, and missing. We took thirty-five prisoners, including three doctors, who were released.

ATTACK UPON THE CAMP OF THE SIXTH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS (WILSON'S ZOUAVES), ON SANTA ROSA ISLAND, OCTOBER 9, 1861.

Picture
Captain Dupont
Battle of Santa Rosa

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $155.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net


 

 

site stats

 

Site Copyright 2003-2014 Son of the South. For Questions or comments about this collection,

contact: paul@sonofthesouth.net

privacy policy

Are you Scared and Confused? Read My Snake Story, a story of hope and encouragement, to help you face your fears.