Abraham Lincoln Suspends the Writ of Habeas Corpus

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 9, 1861

Below is an online version of the original Harper's Weekly newspaper for November 9, 1861. This newspaper features a variety of original Civil War content. Of particular interest is a large map of the Civil War, showing the various parts of the country at this time. The paper also has news stories on the important events of the war at this time.

(Scroll Down to see entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest.)

 

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa Island

Poem

Poem for a Wounded Soldier

Naval Expedition

Naval Expedition

Mississippi River

Mississippi River Battle

Leesburg

Battle of Leesburg

Arkansas

Arkansas Troops

Lincoln Suspends Habeas Corpus

Lincoln Suspends Habeas Corpus

Plantation Slave

Plantation Slave Cartoon

The Battle of Edwards's Ferry

Shenandoah Valley

The Shenandoah Valley

Annapolis

Annapolis, Maryland

Civil War Map of Southern States

 

 

NOVEMBER 9, 1861.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

719

PORTABLE,

DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE.

SAILING OF THE GREAT NAVAL EXPEDITION.

THE great naval and military expedition which has been for some time preparing and assembling from different points, and of which we have published several illustration, sailed from Hampton Roads on 27th for its destination. The squadron is composed of no less than a hundred vessels. The naval portion is under the command of Commodore Samuel F. Dupont, and the military portion is commanded by General Thomas W. Sherman. The appearance of this fleet as it left Fortress Monroe is described as one of the most magnificent scenes in the annals of American history.

SPRINGFIELD RETAKEN.

Springfield was again occupied by the National troops on Saturday evening, and the retreat of the rebel Price, with his army, is thus cut off, and he will be forced either to give battle, with the certainty of defeat, or to surrender. The occupation of Springfield was preceded by one of the most brilliant achievements which have yet marked the progress of the war. Major Segoyne, at the head of General Fremont's body-guard, made a charge upon a body of the enemy, upward of two thousand strong, drawn up in line of battle at their camp near the town. He completely routed them, and cleared them from the vicinity, after which he hoisted the National flag on the court-house, and then retired temporarily, to await a reinforcement which soon joined him.

AFFAIR AT ROMNEY.

General Kelly, the hero of Philippi, having sufficiently recovered from the serious wound received there to resume active operations, has again made his mark against the rebels. He marched from New Creek, in Hampshire County, on Friday night last, and attacked the enemy at Romney on Saturday afternoon, routing them and capturing many prisoners, together with three pieces of cannon and all their wagons and camp equipage. The rebels, in their precipitate retreat, took the road toward Winchester. The National loss was but trifling.

EXTENSION OF OUR LINES.

General Heintzelman, whose Division constitutes the extreme left, resting on the Potomac, is gradually extending his pickets further toward the rebel positions down the river, while the Excelsior Brigade, on the other side of the river, is making a corresponding movement.

CLOSING OF THE POTOMAC.

The rebels have now a continuous line of batteries from Matthias Point to Freestone Point, and the navigation of the Potomac has ceased for the present. Emboldened by the success of the rebel batteries in interrupting the navigation of the Potomac for national vessels, the rebel steamer George Page, which has for months been lying up Aquia Creek awaiting her opportunity, has now ventured out upon the Potomac. She was cruising between Shipping Point and Evansport on Wednesday afternoon, crowded with men, and ran over to the Maryland shore once, throwing a couple of shell toward the position of the Excelsior Brigade. All the Government transports, it is understood, have gone round to Annapolis, and supplies are now forwarded to Washington from that point.

It is asserted, as we close this record, that the rebels have no batteries at Matthias Point.

THE HABEAS CORPUS SUSPENDED IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

On 23d the President instructed the Marshal for the District of Columbia not to serve writs on the Provost Marshal, but return them to the Court with the explanation that the President has, for the present, suspended the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus in cases relating to the military for reasons of public necessity.

ZOLLICOFFER DEFEATED.

On 20th October the rebel Zollicoffer made an attack on Camp Wild Cat, about forty miles below Camp Dick Robinson, in Kentucky. Zollicoffer's force numbered 6000 infantry, 1500 cavalry, and one battery of artillery. The first attack was made about 11 o'clock in the forenoon, at two points, and was gallantly repulsed by the National troops under Colonels Garrard and Schaft. Another attack was made about 1 o'clock in the afternoon which was also repulsed, and a scattering fire was kept up until 3, when Zollicoffer drew off. The National forces numbered only 3000, but they had a decided advantage in the position.

BATTLE NEAR PILOT KNOB.

A rather important battle took place last week at Frederickton, near Pilot Knob, in Missouri. Colonel Plummer, with detachments of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, attacked and completely routed 5000 rebels under Generals Jeff Thompson and Lowe. The latter was killed, together with a large number of the enemy—how many it is not stated. The loss on our side was five killed, five severely wounded, and twenty slightly wounded. The National troops behaved splendidly, each detachment striving to excel the others in acts of bravery.

CONVICTION OF A PRIVATEER.

The trial in Philadelphia of Walter W. Smith, one of the crew of the late privateer Jeff Davis, captured on board the Enchantress, was concluded on 25th, and resulted in his conviction of the crime of piracy. The Jury was out but half an hour.

REGULARS COMING FROM THE PACIFIC.

The Alta Californian of October 2, notices the receipt of orders by General Sumner to dispatch at once to the East the entire force of regulars on the Pacific coast. This force numbers 3200 men. It will take a month to collect it from its scattered posts. Volunteer forces are to garrison the forts from which they are withdrawn.

THE ELLSWORTH AVENGERS.

The People's Ellsworth Regiment, Colonel Stryker, arrived in Washington on 25th from Albany. The regiment numbers 1060 rank and file, and is fully armed, equipped, and uniformed. None of the men are over thirty years of age, and all of them are unmarried.

STRENGTH OF THE UNION ARMY.

From reliable sources the Herald has compiled a table showing the number of troops each loyal State has now in the field or on their way to the seat of war;

States.   Infantry.   Cavalry.   Artillery.   Total.

Connecticut   4,188   100   —   4,288

Illinois    41,000   8,000   —   49,000

Indiana    30,000   2,000   500   32,500

Iowa    16,100   3,600   —   19,700

Kansas   4,000   1,000   200   5,200

Massachusetts   29,000   —   350   29,350

Maine    8,000   1,200   —   9,200

Michigan ...   18,784   5,800   300   24,884

Minnesota    3,000   -   —   3,000

New York    85,000   5,000   500   90,500

New Jersey   9,000   —   —   9,000

New Hampshire   5,000   —   200   5,200

Ohio    63,000   3,500   600   67,100

Pennsylvania   51,000   4,000   800   55,800

Rhode Island    2,628   —   750   3,378

Vermont    5,000   100   —   5,100

Wisconsin    10,000   1,200   1100   12,300

Total   384,700   35,500    5300   425,500

In addition to the above there are the State and Government troops in Kentucky and Missouri, which may be estimated as follows:

Government.   State.

Missouri    10,000   25,000

Kentucky    8,000   20,000

Total    18,000   45,000

There are also five thousand volunteers raised in California, five thousand in Maryland, one thousand six hundred in Delaware, and two thousand in the District of Columbia, besides ten thousand regulars, which, added together, will show the Union land forces to number five hundred and twelve thousand men.

THE NEW STATE OF KANAWHA.

The people of Northwestern Virginia (the 39 counties now openly adhering to the Union) voted last week on the

question of being set off from the Old Dominion and formed into the new State of Kanawha. So far as we have returns, a large majority voted for the new State.

COMPLETION OF THE PACIFIC TELEGRAPH.

The Pacific Telegraph was completed to San Francisco on 24th, and messages now pass freely between New York and that distant point on the Pacific coast. The first dispatch sent over the line was from Stephen J. Field, Chief-Justice of California, to President Lincoln.

UNION FEELING IN NORTH CAROLINA.

Rev. Mr. Conway, Chaplain of the Ninth New York Volunteers, arrived at Washington on 25th, from Hatteras Inlet, whence he was dispatched by General Williams to the President, informing him of the loyal feeling of the citizens of Hyde County, North Carolina, and bringing with him a declaration of independence of the people of that county, announcing themselves forever free and independent of the Rebel Confederacy, together with a request for arms for their defense. They are represented as suffering terribly—almost to the point of starvation—from the despotism of the rebel army.

REBELS GOING HOME.

Reports from Kentucky, by way of Cairo, inform us that a large portion of the rebel forces lately at Columbus, under General Polk, have been sent to New Orleans and Mobile, in anticipation, probably, of a descent upon those places by the great naval expedition which has already sailed, or is about to sail.

THE DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS.

A Doctor Bradley, a Southern refugee, just arrived at Washington, reports that great preparations are making at New Orleans to resist invasion by the National forces. Four 32-pounders had been planted on the Custom-house, which commands the river for some distance, and guns of smaller calibre had been placed upon the roofs of other buildings not so strongly constructed. Light draft boats had been assigned to duty on Lake Pontchartrain. Dr. Bradley states that Confederate currency in many parts of the South has already depreciated thirty per cent.

WHEREABOUTS OF MESSRS. SLIDELL AND MASON.

A vessel just arrived front the West Indies brings intelligence that the rebel steamship Theodora arrived at Cardenas, Cuba, direct from Charleston, with Mason and Slidell on board, en route for Europe. The French Consul and family were alto in the Theodora.

FOREIGN NEWS.

FRANCE.

MOVEMENTS OF ROYAL PERSONAGES.

The King of Prussia enjoyed a very agreeable reception from Napoleon at Compeigne. King Francis the Second (ex), of Naples, will not be represented at the coronation of the King of Prussia. The Queen of Madagascar is dead. Her son has been proclaimed King, and he has formally demanded a French protectorate.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

Ladies — Try it. ANDREWS' EXCELSIOR YEAST POWDER, for many years established in public favor, is still the most desirable article for the Intelligent Housekeeper ! This compound is perfectly healthful and dietetic, and ready for use in one minute ! There can be no delay or mishap in the raising of Bread, Pancakes, or Tea Biscuits ! It is the neatest preparation extant. Dr. Chilton's certificate of its efficacy and wholesomeness on each label.

Ask your Grocer for ANDREWS' YEAST POWDER. On using it, you will tell him, IT IS THE BEST !

Sold at Wholesale by

THOMAS ANDREWS & CO.,

136 and 138 Cedar Street, New York.

Choice, Curious, and Valuable Books.

The Subscriber has just received from Europe, and now offers for sale at very low prices, a vast assortment of Books, both new and old. Among them are fine works of the Latin and Greek Fathers, Classics, Theology, Fine Arts, Poetry, Drama, French and Italian Classics, Bibliography, Antiquaries, Biography, Heraldry, History, Languages, Voyages and Travels, Natural History, Books of Engravings, Picture Galleries, &c. Also, a very large assortment of English Law Books. Catalogues of the same will be issued from time to time, and sent to any address gratis on application to T. W. REEVE, Importer of Books, 138 Fulton Street, up stairs, between Nassau and Broadway, New York City.

A New Cartridge Revolver,

Carrying Six Balls (80 to the pound). Any one wanting a superior Pocket or Belt Arm will find this to be the best in the market. Price $12.00.

MERWIN & BRAY, Agents, 245 Broadway, N. Y.

This Day Published,
Revised Regulations
FOR THE
Army of the United States.
1861.
WITH A FULL INDEX.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

WASHINGTON, August 10, 1861. WHEREAS, it has been found expedient to revise the Regulations for the Army, and the same having been approved by the President of the United States, he commands that they be published for the information and government of the military service, and that, from and after the date hereof, they shall be strictly observed as the sole and standing authority upon the matter therein contained.

Nothing contrary to the tenor of these Regulations will be enjoined in any part of the forces of the United States by any commander whatsoever.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.

One Volume Octavo. 559 pp. Price $2.00.

Important changes and additions have been made to this REVISED Edition of the ARMY REGULATIONS, and it should at once be in the hands of all who have the previous editions.

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.,

Publishers and Booksellers,

22 and 24 N. Fourth Street, Philadelphia.

A WONDERFUL LITTLE MICROSCOPE, MAGNIFYING small objects 500 times, sent to any applicant on receipt of twenty-five cents in silver, and one pink stamp. Five of different powers for one dollar. Address Mrs. M. S. WOODWARD, Box 1854, Philad., Pa.

Cloaks !   Cloaks !
BRODIE
has made his
Grand Opening
of
Fall and Winter Cloaks,
at his
OLD STAND,
300 Canal Street,
and
His Palace of Fashion, Cor. of 23d Street,
New York.
WINTER FASHIONS.-SPLENDID NOVELTIES FOR 1861-62. Extra Large and magnificent FASHION-PLATES; nearly 100 Splendid ENGRAVINGS; Reliable Information; and 3 full-sized PATTERNS, in the Winter No. of

MME. DEMOREST'S QUARTERLY MIRROR OF
FASHIONS. Now Ready.

Largest and best Fashion Magazine ever issued. Yearly, $1, with a Premium ; postage on Premium, 3 cents. Single copies, 25 cents ; without the Plates and full-sized Patterns, 10 cents. Specimen copies sent, postaid, on receipt of the price. Published at Mme. DEMOREST'S Emporium, 473 Broadway, N. Y., and sold everywhere.

Jewelry ! Jewelry !

The Head-Quarters for all Cash Buyers of Fine and Cheap Jewelry,
Miniature Pins of all the
Heroes. Great Bargains, especially in all kinds of Gift and Envelope Jewelry. Persons wishing to see Samples, enclose Stamp for full particulars.

W. A. HAYWARD,

(Manufacturing Jeweler),

208 Broadway.

Prize-Medal, Paris Exhibition, 1855.
LAWSON & CO., Printing-Ink Manufacturers,
NEW YORK, LONDON, and PARIS.

New York Depot, 2 Franklin Square, Pearl Street. HARPER'S WEEKLY, and all the principal Illustrated Newspapers in America and Europe, are printed with L. & Co.'s Inks.

Every Man his Own Printer.

Portable Printing Offices, for Merchants, Druggists, and Professional Men. Send for a Circular.

ADAMS PRESS COMPANY, 117 Fulton Street, and 31 Park Row, New York.

How to Obtain a Patent.

Messrs. MUNN & CO., Editors of the Scientific American, and for fifteen years Solicitors of American and European Patents, have issued a neat pamphlet, giving advice "How to obtain a Patent," which they furnish free by mail. All Inventors who wish to take Patents should send for it. Address   MUNN & CO.,

37 Park Row, New York.

GAME, MEATS, FISH, &c., improved by the use of Lea & Perrin's Worcestershire Sauce. JOHN DUNCAN & SONS,

Union Square and 14th Street, Sole Agents.

$100 PER MONTH. — Agents positively make it selling Dodin's patent Hem Folder and Tuck Guage, for machine or hand sewing, and other articles of ready sale. Call on or address (enclosing stamp) JOSEPH DODIN, 22 Duane Street, N. Y.

Ladies Read: Sent Free.—Important information to weak and debilitated Females. Address Dr. M. BROWN, New York.

" What Cheer?"— Yeast Cakes, made from pure hops, unequaled for raising Bread and Pastry. For Buckwheat Cakes most excellent. Sold by Grocers generally.

Superior Food.—Robinson's Pure Scotch Oatmeal, in pound packets. For Children, Invalids, and others, it will be found most desirable. Sold by all Grocers.

COOLEY'S Cabinet Printing Office for small Printers and Amateurs, the best thing out. Send for Circulars. J. G. COOLEY & CO., 1 Spruce Street, N. Y.

" Matrimony made Easy."—A new work, showing how either sex may be suitably married, irrespective of age or appearance, which can not fail—free for 25 cents. Address T. William & Co., Publishers, Box 2300, Philad.

The New Issue of Postage Stamps, of all denominations, for sale. Apply to HARPER & BROTHERS, Franklin Square, N. Y.

Commercial Agents wanted. Large commission, honorable business. Circular sent. A.W. Harrison, Phila.

A 25 Cent Sewing Machine!

And 5 other curious inventions. Agent, wanted every where. Descriptive Circulars sent free. Address SHAW & CLARK, Biddeford, Maine.

$150 PER MONTH mode by enterprising agents selling DOW'NER'S HEMMER, and SHIELD for hand sewing. Protects the finger and, makes a beautiful hem. Sample sent on receipt of 25 cents. Address A. H. DOWNER, No. 442 Broadway.

SANFORD'S Challenge Heaters.

TO SET IN BRICK,

Or as FIRE PLACE HEATERS.

The most powerful Heaters known for warming DWELLINGS, CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, VESSELS, &c, Send or call for a FULL DESCRIPTION, and an uparalleled mass of testimony, from some our first citizens.

Sanford's Mammoth OR Globe Heaters, Of great power, and economy of fuel, for all places where great heat is wanted, as STORES, HOTELS, R.R. DEPOTS, VESSELS, &c. These Heaters are used by the HUDSON RIVER and other RAILROADS, most of the FERRIES, FIRE ENGINE HOUSES, &c., &c.—Beware of imitations that are inferior. Get Sanford's Mammoth.

The Cosmopolite
Parlor Coal Stove,

With Radiator, Ventilator, and Gas Burning Attachment. Introduced one year ago, already ranks as THE LEADING STOVE for PARLORS, SITTING ROOMS, and all places where a SOFT, PLEASANT HEAT is desired. Fire may be kept all winter with an astonishingly small supply of coal.

The Challenge Air-Tight
Kitchen Ranges.

For Coal and Wood. Have the LARGEST OVENS of any in market ; BAKE PERFECTLY, never failing to brown at the bottom, BOIL, ROAST, and BROIL with great facility, and EXTRAORDINARY

ECONOMY OF FUEL, may be placed in a fire-place or set up as a stove.

Beacon Light, Summer and Winter Portable Range. A very Popular Range, with Six Boiler holes, one large Oven that bakes perfectly, with an arrangement for Roasting or heating Irons at the end.

A Perfect Apparatus for a Few Dollars. Also a GREAT VARIETY of COOKING and HEATING APPARATUS, suited to every want.

Call or send for description and references of above to SANFORD, TRUSLOW & CO..

239 and 241 Water Street, N. Y.

The New Gas Lamps,

For burning Warren's Carbo-Naptha and other Coal Oils as Self-Generating Gas Light, adapted for public and private buildings, gives groat satisfaction. Sample lamp $3. "Vesper Lamps" and Camphene Lamps repaired and altered to burn these Oils. Send Stamp for Circular. CALLENDER & PERCE, 175 Broadway, N. Y., upstairs.

Friends of Soldiers! Send by Harnden's Express (the oldest Express), 74 Broadway, as they charge only half rates.

A sure cure for Rheumatism, Neuralgia, and Salt Rheum. Wholesale Agents F. C. WELLS & CO., 115 Franklin St., New York. Sold by Apothecaries everywhere.

HARPER'S
NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

TERMS.

One Copy for one Year . . . . . . $3.00

Two Copies for One Year . . . . . . 5.00
Three or more Copies for One Year (each) . 2.00
And an Extra Copy, gratis, ,for every Club of EIGHT SUBSCRIBERS.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $4.00.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

HARPER'S WEEKLY.
Single Copies Six Cents.

TERMS.

One Copy for One Year . . . . $2.50

Two Copies for One Year . . . . 4.00
Harper's Weekly and Harper's Magazine, one year, $4.00. HARPER'S WEEKLY will be sent gratuitously for one month—as a specimen—to any one who applies for it. Specimen Numbers of the MAGAZINE will also be sent gratuitously.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS, FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

COTTAGE
Printing Press.

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