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Civil War Harper's Weekly, May 18, 1861

This edition of Harper's Weekly has a number of important stories and illustrations. Of particular note are the full page illustrations of Union Soldiers and Wilson's Fighting Brigade. These are nice examples of period uniforms and equipment. There is also a nice Full page illustration of some Confederate Soldiers under the Rebel Flag.

(Scroll down to see entire page, Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest)

 

The lady Davis

The Washington Arsenal

Editorial on Jeff Davis

Virginia Joins Civil War

Virginia Joins the Civil War

Union Soldiers

Union Soldiers

Civil War Riot

Civil War Riot

War Ship Brooklyn

Warship Brooklyn

Virginian

The Virginian

Ohio Soldiers

Ohio Soldiers

Wilson's fighting Brigade

Wilson's Fighting Brigade

Rebel Soldiers

Confederate Soldiers

Ft. Pickens

Reinforcement of Fort Pickens

Cotton on a Riverboat

Potomac Bridge

The Long Bridge Over the Potomac

   
 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[MAY 18, 1861.

316

QUARTERS OF COMPANIES A AND D, SECOND OHIO INFANTRY, AT CAMP DENNISON, NEAR LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA.—[SKETCHED BY CAPTAIN GEORGE M FINCH.]

HEADQUARTERS OF COLONEL A. McCOOK, OF THE FIRST OHIO INFANTRY, AT CAMP DENNISON, NEAR LANCASTER, PENNSYLVANIA.—[SKETCHED BY CAPTAIN GEORGE M. FINCH.]

(Cont. from Previous Page) After selecting the crews, they were armed to the teeth for covering the landing of the troops. As the enemy threatened to prevent the landing, having stationed coast-guards along shore for that purpose, it was necessary to send a considerable force ; so the Sabine and St. Louis' boats were sent to assist our men. After the moon had set all deck lights were extinguished, to prevent the enemy discovering our movements. Strange to say, the light-house on shore, whose powerful light would make the position of our ships visible, was put out about the same time. Between ten and eleven o'clock the ship got under way, creeping slowly toward the shore and sounding all the way, anchoring in seven fathoms of water, which indicated close proximity to the shore. The boats

were then got alongside, and the men disembarked. At this time the ship's deck presented an interesting and lively spectacle, though all was done very quietly, reflecting great credit upon the officers in command. After all was ready, Lieutenant Albert N. Smith, who had command of the boat expedition, shoved off, and the other boats followed in line. He intended landing on the beach near the ship and marching to the fort—a distance of about three miles—but finding the surf too heavy, he determined to pull into the harbor and land in front of Pickens. He was successful ; the doors of the fort were opened, and the troops entered. In the mean while the Wyandotte carried all the Sabine's marines and put them on the Brooklyn, which, together with the Brooklyn's marines, were to go also. The boats made a second trip, being successful in getting the marines into the fort ; but day broke before the boats got out of the harbor, making the sleepy sentinels on M'Rea and Barrancas rub their eyes in astonishment, not daring to molest the returning party.

The sketch representing the disembarkation gives a correct view of the Brooklyn's gun-deck and battery of nine-inch Dahlgren shell-guns.

WE shall be glad to hear again from our correspondent, and from other officers of the United States fleet now in the Gulf. Sketches of the movements of the ships will always be acceptable.

LANDING THE RHODE ISLAND ARTILLERY AT WASHINGTON.

ON page 305 we give a picture—from a sketch by our special artist—of the landing of the Rhode Island Battery at the Washington Arsenal, from the Bienville, on Thursday, April 25. This is one of the finest batteries in the service. On seeing it, the President could not help observing that it was " the prettiest battery he had ever seen." A newspaper correspondent thus sketches their being sworn in :

" The Rhode Island regiment was sworn in in the east Capitol garden, by Major M'Dowell. The men were inspected by companies, and then formed in a hollow square, the American and Revolutionary flags were brought to the centre, and then, holding up their right hands, the

twelve hundred men repeated the oath after General Thomas, a magistrate of the district. The scene was very imposing, and the setting sun, lighting up the front of the Capitol, strongly relieving the statues against the green-sward, and glancing from bayonets, made the tout ensemble most beautiful. Then, breaking into column, and wearing their red blankets as overcoats, the regiment marched back to quarters, Governor Sprague heading them on horseback."

HOISTING THE STARS AND
STRIPES AT BALTIMORE.

WE illustrate this scene herewith, from a photograph by Mr. Weaver. The Associated Press dispatch thus describes it :

"At noon, on 1st May, the Star-spangled Banner was

raised, with great demonstrations of enthusiasm, from the Post-office and Custom-house, by order of the newly appointed officials. A large crowd assembled in front of the Custom-house to witness the flag-raising. A new flag-staff was erected over the portico, and at precisely quarter to twelve Captain Frazier, a veteran sea-captain of Fells Point, who was assigned the honor, drew up the flag, which, as it spread to the breeze, was greeted with tremendous applause, waving of hats, cheers for the Union and the old flag. The crowd then joined in singing the Star-spangled Banner.'

"After the crowd had left the Custom-house today a man named George Lemmon, in the uniform of the Maryland Guard, deliberately cut down the American flag, which fell into the arms of a bystander. He was immediately arrested by a Deputy Sheriff, and with some difficulty saved from the wrath of the few Union men present, and conveyed to the police station, where he awaits examination. The Guard, it is said, will expel the offender.

"Lemmon was taken before the United States Marshal, and held in $500 security for examination tomorrow. His friends claim that he did not commit the act, while others are positive he cut the halyards with a pocket-knife."

COTTON IN
INDIA.

WE publish on page 314 a graphic picture representing the difficulties of moving cotton to the sea-board in India. Since the rebellion broke out at the South the British consumers of cotton have been moving heaven and earth to obtain a supply of cotton from elsewhere, and especially from India, which already produces a good deal of cotton. The great difficulty in India is in the moving cotton to the ports.

An Indian road is a curious thing. Suppose the dry bed of a considerable mountain torrent placed a little nearer the horizontal than it usually lies, and perhaps it may supply some tolerable notion of the state of an Indian road. A writer on India, speaking of the province of Candeish, says : " In the year 1847 the collector of the district was compelled to grant the cultivators remissions of the land-tax, not from any successive failure of crops, but the very reverse. The yield of the province had become augmented so far beyond the local requirements, and the state (or rather total want) of the roads was such a barrier to the disposal of their produce elsewhere that their crops lay useless on their hands, and they found themselves without means."  (Cont. Next Page)

RAISING THE STARS AND STRIPES OVER THE CUSTOM-HOUSE AT BALTIMORE, ON MAY 1.-[PHOTOGRAPHED BY W. H. WEAVER.]

Ohio Soldiers
Ohio Infantry
Baltimore Custom House

 

 

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