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Civil War Harper's Weekly, September 14, 1861

This 1861 Harper's Weekly newspaper contains a variety of important news of Civil War. The paper contains original woodcut illustrations created by eye-witnesses to these historic events. These pages allow you to see the events of the Civil War unfold, just as the people of the day saw them.

(Scroll Down to See entire page, Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest)

 

Fort Hatteras

Fort Hatteras

Slave Proclamation

Fremont's Slave Proclamation

Martial Law

Martial Law in Missouri

General Rosecrans

General Rosecrans

Indiana Volunteers

22nd Indiana Volunteers

Southern Family Escaping North

Escaping Southern Family

French Regiment

101st French Regiment

Marines

Civil War Marines

Rebel Naval Battery

Rebel Naval Battery

Butler's Expedition

Butler's Southern Expedition

Cannons

Civil War Cannons

Summersville

Battle of Summersville

Abe Lincoln

Abe Lincoln Cartoon

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[SEPTEMBER 14, 1861.

582

THE OHIO LEVEE AT CAIRO.-[SKETCHED BY ALEXANDER SIMPLOT.]

THE TWENTY-SECOND INDIANA VOLUNTEERS AT ST. LOUIS.

WE publish herewith a picture of the ARRIVAL OF THE TWENTY-SECOND INDIANA VOLUNTEERS, Colonel Jefferson C. Davis, at St. Louis, Missouri, from a sketch sent us by a member of the regiment. A letter accompanied the sketch, from which we make the following extracts (want of space alone prevents our giving more)

Our regiment, which was stationed at North Madison, Indiana, up to the 14th August, received orders on that day to proceed immediately to St. Louis, via Indianapolis, which having been made known throughout the camp was met with cheers and shootings, all the boys being delighted at the chance of getting near to one of the seats of war. Having strapped on our knapsacks, canteens, and haver-

sacks, we all fell in in companies, and, 1010 men strong, we left our old quarters in the highest spirits, and amidst the thousand greetings of sympathizing crowds marched to the depot. The trains and engines were waiting for us, three in all, and "All aboard!" being the cry, we tumbled in, soon got rid of our knapsacks, etc., and started in due time.

On the morrow, about ten o'clock, Colonel Woods inspected the new volunteers, and being approved of, the oath was administered, and all cheerfully went in for "three years or the war." The next day (Friday), after dinner, we struck tents, marched to the depot, and, with three roaring cheers, were off once more for the far West.

On our arrival at the Mississippi we disembarked, fell in ranks, and marched to the City of Alton steamboat, which was to convey us across. Tents and all camp equipage were soon aboard, and slowly we steamed across to St. Louis, and in solemn silence, save the words of command, disembarked (see engraving), and the whole regiment drew up on the sidewalk by the levee. "Nothing could enforce more strongly on the mind the sad effects of this

fearful war than the desolate appearance of this levee. Crowded with boats, fires out, and, with a few solitary exceptions, all idle.

At length our Colonel appeared, and four abreast "double quick" up the hill went we, and after going some distance, " right face," "quick march," soon brought us to Washington Avenue to the cheering sounds of fifes and drums. Here we halted. I may here mention, en passant, that, having asked a drink of water from two respectable women who were standing at a door-way to see the troops marching past, one of them kindly brought it; and having asked us two were we not Irishmen, we said yes! " Then," answered she, " you must take something better from a countrywoman, for I feel proud to see ye all come forward so bravely for your adopted country." So off she went, and soon appeared with a tin-cup full of "good old rye!" We drank success to the ladies and the good cause in which we were embarked, and 'neath a scorching sun, and choking with dust, we once more stepped forward briskly, and in about half an hour arrived at our camping ground at " Herzinger's Cave."

A SOUTHERN FAMILY COMING NORTH.

ON page 583 we illustrate one of the most cruel consequences of the war — the exile of Southern families from their homes by the march of the contending armies. For some time past the boats on the Mississippi and the rail-cars running from Tennessee into Kentucky have been crowded with loyal men driven from their homes by the brutal soldiery in the service of the rebels. Many have left property and all they possessed, glad to escape with their lives. Our illustration represents a good old country gentleman leaving his home with his family and servants—all armed for their own protection, and journeying with their own cattle in search of peace.

ARRIVAL OF THE TWENTY-SECOND INDIANA VOLUNTEERS, COLONEL J. C. DAVIS, AT ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI,—[SKETCHED BY JAMES GUIRE.]

Ohio Levee at Cairo
Indiana Volunteers in St. Louis

 

 

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