Approach to Charleston

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 5, 1862

This site contains an online archive of all Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These newspapers will allow you to develop unique insights into the events that made up the Civil War. The illustrations present eye-witness records of this important period in American History.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Cumberland Gap

Cumberland Gap

Before Richmond

Before Richmond

Emancipation Bill

Emancipation Bill

Memphis Post Office

Memphis Post Office

Joe Hooker

General Joe Hooker

Memphis, Tennessee

Affairs in Memphis Tennessee

Silas Casey

General Silas Casey

Fairoaks Battle

Fairoaks Battle Description

Fairoaks

Fairoaks

Charleston

Charleston

Cavalry Charge

Cavalry Charge

   

Charleston Approach

Charleston Approach

Captain Clitheroe

Captain Clitheroe

Negro Cartoon

Negro Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 5, 1862.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

431

(Previous Page) for months now, that it had only been a delusion—that you were the very life of my life, as no one else ever had been or could be."

"And you never spoke?"

"How could I? I was a woman."

"And so, but for this sudden parting, you would have let me go all my life through and never know that the treasure I coveted was mine! Oh, child, I have kept my word to you. I have not forsaken you, or staid away from you, but it has been a sore trial."

He knelt down beside me, and folded me in that strong clasp of his. His eyes shone with a measureless content. I could feel the beating of his heart full and strong—the heart which was to be my home.

He looked up after a while, and said, oh, so tenderly,

"Florence, the life I was going to offer my country was worth so little to me that to give it was no sacrifice. Must I withdraw the offering, now that you have made it infinitely precious?"

I knew what his wish was. Perhaps I should not have loved him so well if he had been capable of giving up the right, even for me. I knew that I but echoed the resolve in his own soul when I answered him—

"No, you shall fight for two."

"Then it must be my wife who will watch and pray for me—my wife who will welcome me when I come back. To-morrow, love, you must be mine. I could die happier knowing that you bore my name, and had a wife's right to weep for me."

I did not refuse—how could I? The next day we were married.

He has passed, unscathed, through many a fierce fight, ever, as I knew he would be, in the thickest of the fray. I have faith, at length, in my own happiness. I believe Heaven guards him; and by-and-by, with laurels on his brow, he will come back to love and me—my hero—my husband!

THE JEW'S GARDEN.

I KNEW it in winter, when flowers were few,

When days were dim with unfruitful hours—

Next door but one the little old Jew

I knew he was fond of flowers.

For the weather had often his wistful gaze,

And he changed as the weather was warm or cool;

I knew it, too, by his cheerful ways

With the children coming from school. 

'Twas the emerald edge of the month of May,

With a spirit of bloom in the balmy air:

"Will you look at my garden?" said he, one day;

It is full of promises fair."

I smiled as we neared it. A cramped recess

Amid angular walls of commodious art,

It lay, like Beauty, companionless—

Like song in a sordid heart.

But the tired airs panted among the plants there,

Which, by devious ways, they had come to claim,

And the voice of love fell from the dove-cotes near,

And the crippled sunbeams came.

And never a care of the noisome air,

The din of the street, or the dingy place,

Did the young growths take in that garden there,

As if blessed with a genial grace.

Never a care took the Bean, but to vie With Ivy and Hop that blindly run,

With small hands holding the strings whereby
They feel their way up to the sun;

Nor the Daffodil, but to dazzle and yield

A tune to the eye with its golden bells;

Nor the Giant of Battle, whose blood-red shield

Enchants the look which it quells.

But lo! a mound—a miniature mound!

A sensitive plant, with its hands half shut, Stands softly near as in prayer profound—

A Heart's-ease smiles at the foot.

The quaint old Jew, with his cheerful chat

On the habits and hues and names of flowers, Never glanced at this, the gem of the plat,

And, most likely, the labor of hours.

Till I said, "What is it, my friend—this mound,
Moss-mantled and wee, like a fairy's grave,
And those typical plants that guard it around?"

I paused at the sigh he gave.

He spoke no word, but his eyes slowly filled—

The air grew still and the sunlight sere;

And then, as the Sensitive plant was thrilled

By the old man's falling tear,

A vision arose of a greener grave

In a distant land, in the distant years,

And I knew the mourner who knelt and gave

A youthful tribute of tears.

And I thought, this old man here, to this day,

May have lived by brokerage, cheat, and bribe—

May have fawned, and lied, and clutched, and grown gray

In the sordid curse of his tribe.

But surely, I thought, love falls, like dew,

On his heart from the heaven of by-gone hours; And surely God loves the little old Jew,

So cheerful and fond of flowers.

THE APPROACH TO CHARLESTON.

ON page 429 we give a BIRDS-EYE VIEW OF CHARLESTON AND VICINITY, showing James Island and Stono Inlet, and the position of our forces and our gun-boats. We take the following extracts from correspondents' letters from the army:

It is but a little way from here to Charleston. From our outposts, looking across the narrow skirt of the island, we can plainly see Fort Johnson, and in a line beyond it Fort Sumter. Still farther the spires of the city and the masts of a few lonely vessels rise dimly to the view. But interposing is a force as large, I think, as our own, and they gave us, in the skirmish of yesterday, an evidence of dash and daring for which our men seemed hardly prepared. They are, of course, alarmed for the safety of the city. It may be that they will abandon it at once, seeing as they soon must that its possession must ultimately be transferred to the Union army. But we have every reason to expect a desperate resistance on their part, and hard fighting on our own, before the Stars and Stripes will float in triumph over Sumter's walls.

There has been a good deal of skirmishing between our forces and those of the rebels, resulting in our success. The rebels have been on the aggressive since we ceased to advance, and have given us one or two very pretty fights. They are in very strong force upon James Island, and have a large reserve in Charleston and on neighboring islands. The failure of Colonel Christ to destroy the railroad bridge at Pocotaligo, and thereby sever the main artery between Charleston and Savannah, has enabled the rebels to concentrate a very large force in and about Charleston, with ample means to increase it at short notice. In this they have the advantage of' us. They can move troops with greater rapidity and concentrate more easily than we. Still we have managed thus far to get a little ahead of them, and would to-day have been in Charleston if a little more transportation could have been procured. One brigade failed to be on the ground assigned it in consequence of lack of transportation, and the moment which found Charleston nearly unprotected on that approach was forever lost, and when the movement was finally attempted the avenue of approach was found almost impregnable. The cause of the failure of the movement, I presume,, will be investigated.

ADVERTISEMENTS.

To Mothers.

JUST PUBLISHED—12mo. Price 50 cents. Free by mail on receipt of the price, "Advice to a Mother on the Management of Her Offspring in Infancy, Childhood, and Youth." By Pye Henry Chavasse, M.D.

"This little volume answers over three hundred questions, which none but a mother would think of asking, concerning the management of children from birth till they arrive at the age of puberty. If we mistake not, the information conveyed covers all the cases that can, by any possibility, arise respecting the numerous ills that he in wait for children. The book is written in a popular form, and cannot but prove acceptable to mothers and nurses."

BAILLIERE BROTHERS, Publishers, No. 440 Broadway, N. Y.

BOOKS, MAGAZINES. WEEKLY
PAPERS, &c.

No. 113 Nassau Street, New York.

HENRY DEXTER,

Successor to the late firm of

DEXTER & BROTHER, Would call the attention of News Agents, Country Booksellers, and Periodical Dealers generally, to his long-known first-class means of supplying their business demands. All orders for Books Magazines, Papers, Stationery, Toys or any other article appertaining to the trade, will continue to be filled with the well-known care and dispatch that, for the last seventeen years, has characterized the business of the late firm. The old customers of this house are sufficiently acquainted with the advantages of their dealings with it. To new customers, a fair trial is all that is asked. Price lists sent free, on application. Packing and forwarding carefully attended to. Orders and Subscriptions for European Books, Periodicals, and Papers promptly executed. The London and other Illustrated Papers by every steamer.

HENRY DEXTER,

Successor to Dexter & Brother.

MUSIC WITHOUT A MASTER.

PIANO, GUITAR, and MELODEON without a Master, containing Full Instructions, and 50 SONGS, MARCHES, WALTZES, POLKAS, &c., 50 cents each. CONCERTINA, VIOLINCELLO, FIFE without a Master, Full Instructions and Music, 50 cents each. VIOLIN, FLUTE, ACCORDEON without a Master, Instructions and Music, 30 cents each. SELF-INSTRUCTOR for VIOLIN, FLUTE, ACCORDEON, and FLUTINA, 30 cents each. Sent, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the publishers, OLIVER DITSON &.CO., Boston.

ENGLISH BIBLE.

AMERICAN EPISCOPAL PRAYER BOOK
WAREHOUSE.

EYRE & SPOTISWOODE,

626 Broadway, N. Y.

To all Wanting Farms.

Large and thriving settlement of Vineland. Rich soil. Good crops of Wheat, Corn, Peaches, &c., to be seen—only 30 miles from Philadelphia. Delightful climate—20 acre tracts of from $15 to $20 per acre, payable within 4 years. Good schools and society. Hundreds are settling. Apply to CHAS. K. LANDIS, P.M., Vineland, Cumberland Co., New Jersey. Report of Solon Robinson and Vineland Rural sent free. From Report of Solon Robinson, Ag. Ed. Tribune.

"It is one of the most extensive fertile tracts, in an almost level position, and suitable condition for pleasant farming that we know of this side of the Western Prairies.

Commercial Travelers and Agents
Wanted to Sell our

25 Cent Portfolio Package.

Contents—18 Sheets Note Paper, 18 Envelopes, 1 Penholder, 1 Pen, 1 Pencil, 1 Blotting Pad, 100 Recipes, 1 War Hymn, 5 Engravings, 1 New Method for Computing Interest, 9 Fashionable Designs for Marking Letters, 4 Ladies' Undersleeves, 2 ladies' Collars, 1 Ladies' Underskirt, 1 Ladies' Embroidered Body and Sleeves, 2 Infant's Christening Robes, 1 Child's Apron, 1 Child's Full Dress, 1 Misses' Embroidered Dress, 1 Handkerchief Border, 1 Pen Wiper, 1 Edging. Also, one FASHIONABLE article of RICH JEWELRY. Agents make $10 a day. Send stamp for Circular of wholesale prices. Sample 50 cents. WEIR & CO., Publishers, 34 South Third St., Philadelphia, Pa.

HEAD-QUARTERS FOR CHEAP JEWELRY.—HEAD-QUARTERS FOR LOCKETS, BRACELETS, VEST CHAINS, PINS, RINGS, STUDS, BUTTONS, AND EVERYTHING IN THE JEWELRY LINE. FOR FULL PARTICULARS ADDRESS W A. HAYWARD, MANUFACTURING JEWELER, 208 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

Every Man his own Printer.

Portable Printing-Offices for the Army and Navy, Druggists, and Business Men generally. Send for a circular.

ADAMS PRESS COMPANY, 31 Park Row (under Lovejoy's Hotel), New York.

FRIENDS OF SOLDIERS!

All Articles for Soldiers at Baltimore, Washington, Hilton Head, Newbern, and all places occupied by Union troops, should be sent, at half rates, by HARNDEN'S EXPRESS, No. 74 Broadway. Sutlers charged low rates.

Wedding Cards and Note Papers at J. EVERDELL'S celebrated Engraving Establishment, 302 Broadway, cor. Duane Street, N. Y. Samples by mail.

DO YOU WANT LUXURIANT WHISKERS OR MUSTACHES?—My Onguent will force then to grow heavily in six weeks (upon the smoothest face) without stain or injury to the skin. Price $1—sent by mail, post free, to any address, on receipt of an order. R. G. GRAHAM, No. 109 Nassau Street, N. Y.

Are now considered the best Pianos manufactured. Each instrument warranted for five years. Warerooms, Nos. 82 and 84 Walker Street, near Broadway, N, Y.

J. H. Winslow & Co., Late W. Forsyth & Co.

100,000

Watches, Chains, Sets of Jewelry, Gold Pens, Bracelets, Lockets, Rings, Gent's Pins, Sleeve Buttons, Studs, &c., &c.

Worth $500,000,

To be sold for ONE DOLLAR each, without regard to value, and not to be paid for until you know what you are to get. Send for Circular containing full list and particulars.

Certificates of all the various articles, stating what each one can have, are first put into envelopes, sealed up, and mixed; and when ordered, are taken out without regard to choice, and sent by mail, thus giving all a fair chance. On receipt of the Certificate you will see what you can have, and then it is at your option to send one dollar and take the article or not.

In all transactions by mail, we shall charge for forwarding the Certificates, paying postage, and doing the business, 25 cents each, which must be enclosed when the certificate is sent for. Five Certificates will be sent for $1, eleven for $2, thirty for $5, sixty-five for $10, and one hundred for $15.

AGENTS.—Those acting as Agents will be allowed ten cents on every certificate ordered by them, provided their remittance amounts to one dollar. Agents will collect 25 cents for every Certificate and remit 15 cents to us, either in cash or postage stamps. Great caution should be used by our correspondents in regard to giving their correct address, Town, County, and State. Address J. H. WINSLOW & CO., P. O. Box 5029, 208 Broadway, New York. N.B. We wish it distinctly understood that all articles of jewelry not giving perfect satisfaction can be returned and the money will be refunded.

Watches.

A wholesale stock of 10,000 Watches to be retailed at wholesale prices. This is the first opportunity offered for purchasing a single Watch on equally as good terms as the regular trade buy by the Dozen.                Solid Silver Hunting Case Cylinders, at $8, usual price $12.             Sold Silver Hunting Lever Watches, at $10, usual price, $15.             Solid Silver Hunting Case English Levers, at $25, usual price, $40.             The justly celebrated American Silver Hunting Case Lever Watch, at $20, usual price, $30 and $35.

All orders from soldiers under the rank of captain, and from points south of Washington, must be accompanied with funds in full, as the Express Companies refuse to take packages south of Washington to be paid for on delivery. Parties ordering from other sections will please enclose $2, as a gurantee that the package will be taken; and they can pay the balance to the Express. Send for a Circular. J. L. FERGUSON, 208 BROADWAY, N. Y.

"Get the Best."

AGENTS WANTED TO SELL

THISTLE A CO.'S

25 AND 10 CENT ENTIRELY NEW PRIZE STATIONERY PACKAGES.

They are the largest, best, and cheapest manufactured. Send for circular containing particulars. Mailed free.

THISTLE & CO., 130 Nassau Street, N. Y.

Ballard's Patent Breech-Loading Rifle.

This arm is entirely new, and is universally acknowledged to be the nearest to perfection of any Breech-Loading Rifle ever made. Length of barrel 24 inches, weight of Rifle 7 pounds. Size of Calibre adapted to Nos. 32, 38, and 44 copper water-proof Cartridges. Also,

Prescott's Cartridge Revolvers

The 8in., or Navy Size, carries a Ball weighing 38 to the lb., and the No. 32, or 4in. Revolver, a Ball 80 to the lb. By recent experiments made in the Army, these Revolvers were pronounced the best and most effective weapons in use. For particulars call or send for a Circular to

MERWIN & BRAY, Sole Agents,

      No. 262 Broadway, N. Y.

For catalogue and prices of Stencil Materials, adddress

T. N. HICKCOX, 280 Pearl Street, New York. EMPLOYMENT.—Agents Wanted in every Town and County to enter into a respectable and permanent business. For particulars address, with red stamp,   DR. J. H. WARNER, 54 East 12th Street, New York.

EMPLOYMENT. A NEW ENTERPRISE. THE FRANKLIN SEWING MACHINE Co.

want a number of Agents. A liberal salary and expenses paid, or commission allowed. Address, with stamp, HARRIS BROTHERS, Boston, Mass. (Clip this out for reference.)

SOMETHING NEW. —AGENTS WANTED. 12 New Articles. Sales and profits large. Samples 25 cents. Inclose stamp. RICE & CO., N. Y., or Chicago, Ill.

Comfort and Cure for the Ruptured.

Supplied free of charge.

Address Box 788, New York P. O.

For Sale or to Let.

The premises Nos. 809 and 811 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, formerly occupied by Messrs. L. J. Levy & Company. For Terms, &c.

Apply to   HARPER & BROTHERS,

         New York.

HARPER & BROTHERS,

FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK,

Have just Published

NORTH AMERICA. By ANTHONY TROLLOPE, Author of "The West Indies and the Spanish Main," "Doctor Thorne," "The Bertrams," "Framley Parsonage," "Castle Richmond," "The Three Clerks," "Orley Farm," &c. Large 12mo, Cloth, 60 cents

ABEL DRAKE'S WIFE. A Novel. By JOHN SAUNDERS, Author of "The Shadow in the House," &c. 8vo, Paper, 25 cents.

HARPER'S HAND-BOOK FOR TRAVELLERS IN EUROPE AND THE EAST: Being a Guide through France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Austria, Italy, Sicily, Egypt, Syria, Turkey, Greece, Switzerland, Russia, Denmark, Sweden, Spain, and Great Britain and Ireland. By W. PEMBROKE FETRIDGE. With a Map embracing Colored Routes of Travel in the above Countries. Large 12mo, Cloth, $2.75; Leather, $3.00; Half Calf, $3.50; Roan with Tucks (for the Traveller's Pocket), $3.50.

New Novel by the Author of'

"ADAM BEDE."

HARPER'S

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE
For July, 1862.

CONTENTS:

A FLYING TRIP THROUGH NORWAY. FIRST PAPER.

ILLUSTRATIONS. —In Norseland. — Steamer entering the Fjord.—The Islands.—Coast of Norway.—Approach to Christiana.—Station-House, Logen Valley.—Station Boy. — Good-by. — Norwegian Peasant Family. — The Post-Girl.

SOCIAL AESTHETICS.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—The Venus of Milo.—Horned Head-Dresses.—Head-Dresses, 1750.—Ball Dress, 1810.—Marguerite of Lorraine, 1590.—La Belle Hamilton, 1670.—Queen Elizabeth.—Catherine de Medicis, 1550.—Marguerite of Lorraine.—Shawl and Lady, 1859.—Ringing the Bell.—Evening Dress, 1812.—Normandy Peasant Girl.—Mrs. Flounsir.—Lady Percy and Northumberland.—Heloise, 1150.

SURRY COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—The Windsor Chair.—"Good-mornin', Ladies."—The Pigeon-Roost.—The Horn-Snake.—The Wedding.—The Night-Meeting.—The Fire-Hunt.

WRECKED AND RESCUED.

LOUIS AGASSIZ.

ORLEY FARM. By ANTHONY TROLLOPS. Illustrated by J. E. MILLAIS.

CHAPTER LVII. The Loves and Hopes of Albert Fitzallen.

CHAPTER LVIII. Miss Stavely declines to eat Minced Veal.

CHAPTER LIX. No Surrender.

CHAPTER LX. What Rebekah did for her Son. ILLUSTRATIONS.—Father and Daughter.—The Two Peregrines.

THE HARTFORD CONVENTION.

THE UNSIGNED RECEIPT.

MISTRESS AND MAID. A HOUSEHOLD STORY. By Miss MULOCK.

DOWN IN THE GLEN AT IDLEWILD.

THE ADVENTURES OF PHILIP. By W. M. THACKERAY.

CHAPER XXXVII. Nec plena Cruoris Hirudo.

CHAPTER XXXVIII. The Bearer of the Bow-String. ILLUSTRATIONS.—The Old Man of the Mountains.—Joan of Arc.—Judith and Holofernes.

LOIS.

IF I COULD KNOW.

THE DEAD-LETTER OFFICE.

MONTHLY RECORD OF CURRENT EVENTS.

LITERARY NOTICES.

EDITOR'S TABLE.

EDITOR'S EASY CHAIR.

EDITOR'S FOREIGN BUREAU.

EDITOR'S DRAWER.

FASHIONS FOR JULY.

ILLUSTRATIONS.—Street Costume and Boy's Dress.—Promenade Toilet.

In the present number of HARPER'S NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE, is given the first of a series of papers by J. ROSS BROWNE, descriptive of travels in Northern Europe, illustrated by characteristic sketches by the Author. These papers will include descriptions of journeys in Norway, Poland, and Russia.

Mr. LOSSING'S Article on the "Hartford Convention" is in continuation of the series which will describe, in detail, the attempted insurrections against the United States, beginning with the "Whisky Insurrection," and closing with the "South Carolina Nullification," which was so promptly put down by ANDREW JACKSON.

Dr. WYNNE'S Biographical Papers will contain sketches of the men now living, who are the leading representatives of American Literature and Science.

Mr. THACKERAY'S "Philip" approaches its close. The Publishers are happy to announce that it will be followed, commencing probably in the next Number, by a New Novel, by the Author of "Adam Bede," "The Mill on the Floss," and "Silas Marner."

As an illustrated Magazine, MARPER'S NEW MONTHLY has no rival. Whenever it is possible for the Artist to aid the Writer, his services have been called into requisition. The expense for illustrations alone exceeds the entire cost of the literary and artistic matter of any other similar periodical.

The various Editorial Departments comprise Essays and Notes upon the current topics of the day, at home and abroad, with Anecdotes and Facetiae furnished by hundreds of voluntary contributors in every section of the country. The "Monthly Record of Current Events" presents it connected history of the leading events of the month. In the last Volume, every important incident of the war, from the sailing of the Port Royal Expedition to the victory at Pittsburg Landing, is recorded; with a copious Index, which will enable the reader to refer at once to each.

Any Number will be sent by Mail, post-paid, for Twenty-five Cents. Any Volume, comprising Six Numbers, neatly bound in Cloth, will be sent. by Mail, to any part of the United States within 3000 miles of New York, post-paid, for Two Dollars per Volume. Complete Sets will be sent by Express, the freight at the charge of the purchaser, at a Discount of Twenty-five per Cent. from the above rate. Twenty-Four Volumes, bound uniformly, extending from June, 1850, to May, 1862, are now ready.

TERMS.

One Copy for one Year .................$3.00

Two Copies for One Year ...............5.00

Three or more Copies for One Year (each) ......2.00
And an Extra Copy, gratis, for every Club of EIGHT SUBSCRIBERS.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $4.00.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

   FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

HARPER'S WEEKLY. Single Copies Six Cents.

WILKIE COLLINS'S New Story, entitled "NO NAME," was commenced in the Number for March 15 (No. 272) of HARPER'S WEEKLY, And will be continued from week to week until completed.

TERMS.

One Copy for One Year ..................$2.50

One Copy for Two Years ..................4.00

Ten Copies fur One Year .................18.00

An Extra Copy will be allowed for every Club of TEN SUBSCRIBERS.

HARPER'S MAGAZINE and HARPER'S WEEKLY, together, one year, $4.00.

HARPER'S WEEKLY is electrotyped, and Back Numbers can be had at any time. Vols. I., II., III., IV., and V., for the Years 1857, 1858, 1859, 1860, and 1861, of "HARPER'S WEEKLY," handsomely bound in Cloth extra, Price $3.50 each, are now ready.

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

FRANKLIN SQUARE, NEW YORK.

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Picture

 

 

  

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