General Joe Hooker

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, July 5, 1862

This site contains an online archive of all Harper's Weekly newspapers published during the Civil War. These newspapers will allow you to develop unique insights into the events that made up the Civil War. The illustrations present eye-witness records of this important period in American History.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Cumberland Gap

Cumberland Gap

Before Richmond

Before Richmond

Emancipation Bill

Emancipation Bill

Memphis Post Office

Memphis Post Office

Joe Hooker

General Joe Hooker

Memphis, Tennessee

Affairs in Memphis Tennessee

Silas Casey

General Silas Casey

Fairoaks Battle

Fairoaks Battle Description

Fairoaks

Fairoaks

Charleston

Charleston

Cavalry Charge

Cavalry Charge

   

Charleston Approach

Charleston Approach

Captain Clitheroe

Captain Clitheroe

Negro Cartoon

Negro Cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 5, 1862.]

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

421

BRIGADIER-GENERAL HOOKER.

BRIGADIER-GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, whose portrait we give below, commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the Battle of Fairoaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia.

He was born in Massachusetts about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as Aid-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey. In March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapultepec he again attracted attention by his

gallant and meritorious conduct, and was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel.

At the close of the war with Mexico he withdrew from the service, and soon afterward emigrated to California. The outbreak of the rebellion found him there, and he was one of the first of the old West Pointers who offered his services to the Government. He was one of the first batch of Brigadier-Generals of Volunteers appointed by President Lincoln on 17th May, 1861; and was, on his arrival, placed in command of a brigade of the army of the Potomac, and subsequently of a division. From July, 1861, to February, 1862, he was stationed in Southern Maryland, on the north shore of the Potomac, his duty being to prevent the rebels crossing the river, and to amuse them with their river blockade while McClellan was getting his army into trim. This difficult duty he performed admirably.

BRIGADIER-GENERAL SILAS CASEY, U.S.A.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY J. M'CLEES, PHILADELPHIA.—[SEE PAGE 427.]

BRIGADIER-GENERAL JOSEPH HOOKER, U.S.A.—[PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANTHONY.]

Tunstall Station, Virginia
General Silas Casey
General Joe Hooker

 

 

  

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