Rebels on Hatcher's Run

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, November 19, 1864

Harper's Weekly was the most popular newspaper published during the Civil War. These newspapers were read by millions of people during the war. Today, these newspapers are available on this WEB site for you to read and increase your understanding of the war.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Albemarle

Albemarle

Second Term

Abraham Lincoln Reelected

Slave Conscription

Slave Conscription

One Hundred and Forty Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment

Hatcher's Run

Hatcher's Run

Allatoona

Battle of Allatoona

Over the Hillside

Train Robbery

Train Robbery

Darbytown Road

Battle of Darbytown Road

War Department

War Department

Battery

Civil War Battery

 

 

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY

[NOVEMBER 19, 1864

748

ARMSTRONG'S MILLS AND REBEL WORKS ON HATCHER'S RUN, CAPTURED BY THE SECOND CORPS, OCTOBER 27, 1864.--SKETCHED BY C. H. CHAPIN.—[SEE PAGE 741.]

The door of a small hole. Is breathlessly questioned by the traveler.

" Train leave ? Eight minutes," responds shirt sleeves, pointedly, and buries himself in the hole. And now the ticket-window is thrown up with a loud squeals, a few people appear, an engine leisurely enters the depot and attaches itself to a car. Some one gives the wheels a ringing bang. somebody else, remarks "all aboard," and the stirring city of Middletown is left behind. All wearied out, John re-enters his home, and perceives Sam sitting at a well spread table, eating what he calls a heavy tea, and relating his adventures to his admiring family.

`Hollow, John !" cries he, " where to next, my boy?"

" Hasn't Mollie come yet ?" gasps his brother.

" Lost your Mollie ? Capital joke, " says this unfeeling man, taking a great swallow of coffee. " She is somewhere in Hartford," returns John, grimly. " I'll go to every house in town—" "Wait a bit. Sit down and eat some supper," returns Sam, composedly. " Then I'll help you. Be calm. We must learn to regard these matters philosophically."

Philosophically !" began John, angrily, but swallowed the rest of the sentence with a bite of hot buttered muffin. Then he discovered how hungry

he was; for since breakfast he had eaten nothing but the peanuts.

"I came up in the Spread Eagle myself," said Sam, " but didn't see Mrs. Popkins, not expecting the pleasure, you know. Besides, I was occupied with a forlorn little miss going to boarding school, or something of the sort. By George, what a smile she had! and such a jolly little hand. She was in a terrible state of mind. Expected somebody to meet her who didn't. I made myself as useful as possible, but didn't dare too much. I'll see her again though. But what is the use ?" and he ended with a sigh, thinking of China.

A little after 9 o'clock there came a rap at the door

of No. 46 -- House, rousing Mollie from a distressed doze, and after it John Popkins victorious. " My brother is waiting for us," says John ; "he

he is very impatient to see you (?) Come, Mollie."

Then Sam sees John proudly approaching with a little creature clinging to his arm.

"This is my brother Sam," introducing Mollie's polite acquaintance of the morning. "And this," with illconcealed satisfaction, " is Mrs. Popkins."

On which the elder brother for the first time in his life lost countenance, blundered in his greeting, but finally recovered himself with a desperate attempt at festive welcome—" Long live Mr. and Mrs. Popkins I"

GENERAL CRAWFORD CONDUCTING REBEL PRISONERS TO HIS REAR, OCTOBER 27, 1864.---SKETCHED BY C. H. CHAPIN.—[SEE PAGE 741.]

Hatcher's Run
Rebel Prisoners

 

 

  

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