General Burbridge

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, January 14, 1865

This Civil War Harper's Weekly newspaper is from the last days of the war. It features content on Sherman's march through Georgia, and other news of the war. This issue is part of our extensive collection of original Harper's newspapers. We are creating a digital archive of our collection, and making it available to you on the internet. WE hope you enjoy browsing this historical resource.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Sherman Entering Savannah

Sherman Entering Savannah Georgia

Wilmington

Wilmington

Wilmington

Wilmington Expedition

Saltville

Saltville, Virginia

Making Salt

Making Salt

Map Wilmington

Map of Wilmington

Sherman Captures Savannah

Battle for Savannah

General Burbridge

General Burbridge

Fort McAllister

Battle of Fort McAllister

Waynesborough

Battle of Waynesborough Georgia

Battle of Nashville

Battle of Nashville

Prisoners

Prisoners of War

Drunkard

 

 

HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[JANUARY 14, 1865.

28

GENERAL S. G. BURBRIDGE.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY WEBSTER, LOUISVILLE, KY.—[SEE PAGE 21.]

THE LATE HON. WILLIAM L. DAYTON.-[PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.]

(Previous Page) Savannah at sunrise. Colonel BARNUM'S brigade was the first in town. General SHERMAN'S loss, after he invested Savannah, was from six to eight hundred men.

We give on page 24 an illustration of General KILPATRICK'S last charge at Waynesborough. There were two fights on the march from Atlanta to Savannah. One was the engagement which WOLCOTT had with the enemy at Griswoldville, November 22, in which the enemy was severely repulsed. The other was General KILPATRICK'S affair with WHEELER'S cavalry, December 4. KILPATRICK drove WHEELER'S corps to a strong rail barricade near Waynesborough, and soon, by a most gallant charge, himself at the head of his command, compelled a retreat, which was continued eight miles beyond Waynesborough. In this battle the sabre was used with brilliant effect.  

THE LATE HON. WILLIAM L.
DAYTON.

WILLIAM LEWIS DAYTON was born at Baskinridge, New Jersey, February 17, 1807. He was a farmer's son ; but at an early period of life acquired an excellent education, graduating at the age of eighteen at the College of New Jersey. He immediately entered upon the profession of law. He became quite intimately connected with political affairs, being associated with the Whig party in his State, and especially with the Free Soil wing of that party. In 1837 he was elected a member of the New Jersey Senate, and was made Chairman of the Judiciary Committee. The following year he was chosen by the Legislature one of the associate justices of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, which position he held for three years. Mr. DAYTON in 1842 was appointed United States Senator, to fill a vacancy caused by the death of SAMUEL L. SOUTHARD, and

 in 1845 was elected for the full term of six years. His position during this Senatorial career of nine years was always positive and decided. He was opposed to slavery on the ground of humanity, and always advocated its abolition in the District of Columbia, and its prohibition in the Territories. He voted for the admission of California as a free State, and in 1850, when schemes of compromise every where prevailed, he voted against the Fugitive Slave Law. With these associations in his favor he was in 1856 nominated by the Republican party for Vice-President. When Mr. LINCOLN was elected President in 1860, Mr. DAYTON was appointed Minister to France. It is scarcely possible for the people to adequately appreciate the value of his services in this most important mission. A man of weight and principle, and therefore always firm, he gained both respect and confidence at the French Court. Not withstanding the delicate difficulties of his situation at critical periods during the present war, his courtesy

 and uniform firmness has always carried him safely through. His personal appearance was very fine, and in his manners he was affable and unpre- (Next Page)
 

With these associations in his favor he was in 1856 nominated by the Republican party for Vice-President. When Mr. LINCOLN was elected President in 1860, Mr. DAYTON was appointed Minister to France. It is scarcely possible for the people to adequately appreciate the value of his services in this most important mission. A man of weight and principle, and therefore always firm, he gained both respect and confidence at the French Court. Not withstanding the delicate difficulties of his situation at critical periods during the present war, his courtesy and uniform firmness has always carried him safely through. His personal appearance was very fine, and in his manners he was affable and unpre-

OUR RELEASED PRISONERS AT CHARLESTON, S. C., DANCING ON BOARD THE "STAR OF THE SOUTH."—[SKETCHED BY WILLIAM WAUD.]

General Burbridge
William Dayton
Star of the South

 

 

  

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