The Battle of Laurel Hill

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, August 3, 1861

This Civil War Harper's Weekly newspaper describes a number of important events of the war. It includes eye-witness illustrations of the events, and important news of the day. It also has first edition coverage of the Battle of Bull Run.

(Scroll Down to see the entire newspaper page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to a specific page of interest)

 

Laurel Hill

The Battle of Laurel Hill

Editorial

Editorial

Bull Run

Early Report on Battle of Bull Run

Map Bull Run

Bull Run Battle Map

Tillman and the Waring

Tillman and the Waring

McClellan

General George McClellan Biography

Rowlesburg

Rowlesburg, West Virginia

Bull Run Battle

The Battle of Bull Run

Battle of Carthage

The Battle of Carthage, Missouri

Winchester Virginia

Winchester, Virginia

Bull Run

Start of the Battle of Bull Run

Civil War Weapons

Civil War Weapons

Bull Run Cartoon

Battle of Bull Run Cartoon

 

Hunter's Charge at Bull Run

Hunter's Charge at the Battle of Bull Run

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOL. V.—No. 240.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 3, 1861.

SINGLE COPIES SIX CENTS,

$2 50 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

THE MISSES SCOTT.

SOME time since two young ladies of the name of Scott, residents of Fairfax County Virginia, were the means of capturing the Captain of a volunteer regiment from Connecticut. They have now been taken themselves, and we illustrate, on this page, their appearance as they drove into our lines at Fall's Church. The account of their capture is thus given by a Connecticut boy, one of the scouting party which took them :

After getting out of the woods we came to a corn-field, through which we crawled on our hands and knees, and we got completely "turned," but managed to get through the greatest danger and came to a house, where we went to see what we could make out. We found there an old man, when we asked if any of our troops were there. He wanted to know if we were on the Southern side. Lieut. Upton told him "Yes;" when he told us we were about a mile from their tents, but to look out or we would be captured. We of course appeared frightened, and posted a man outside to look out. Lieutenant Upton told him he was an officer of a South Carolina regiment. The old man told him all about the United States camp, the names of all the secession neighbors, and finally said

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1861, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


BRINGING IN THE MISSES SCOTT AS PRISONERS TO FALL'S CHURCH, VA.—[SKETCHED BY OUR SPECIAL ARTIST.]

he had in his house the two Miss Scotts who took the Yankee Captain, so the old man took us into the room and introduced us to the Miss Scotts. That moment was a proud one for us, for right in our hands were those whom the whole brigade had been hunting for. But we continued to play our part, complimenting the ladies highly for their feat, an I pumping the old man for further information. When, after learning the most direct road to our camp, Lieutenant Upton told them we must go, but he would like to see the whole family together to bid them good-by. Accordingly they all came out in the front porch—the old man, his wife, three sons, and daughter, and the two Miss Scotts. We just formed a circle about them, when Lieutenant Upton, drawing his sword, demanded their surrender to the United States. You ought to have seen their faces! The two Miss Scotts and the young men were all we took with us. The excitement was very great when we went into camp, and we found they had given us up for lost, and sent a company after us. With the two Miss Scotts we marched to the General's quarters, and left the ladies there, and the men we took to the guard-house. The General sent for us in the evening, and complimented us highly for our conduct on this occasion. The ladies of Virginia and Maryland have been, as a rule, fiercer in their secessionism than the men. At Baltimore our troops are insulted daily by ladies.

THE DEATH OF THE REBEL GENERAL GARNETT, AT THE BATTLE OF LAUREL HILL.—[SEE PAGE 484.]

Picture
Civil War Women Prisoners
General Garnett's Death at Laurel Hill

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $165.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net


 

 

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