President Lincoln and Prince Napoleon

 

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Civil War Harper's Weekly, August 24, 1861

This 1861 newspaper has a cover illustration of President Abraham Lincoln. In addition the paper discusses important slavery issues of the day. It has a nice picture and article of Berdan's sharpshooters, and a dramatic illustration of the Battle of Dug Spring.

(Scroll Down to see the entire page, or Newspaper Thumbnails will take you to the page of interest)

 

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VOL. V.—No. 243.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 24, 1861.

SINGLE COPIES SIX CENTS.

$2 50 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

PRINCE NAPOLEON AT WASHINGTON,

WE herewith illustrate THE PRESENTATION OF PRINCE NAPOLEON TO THE PRESIDENT by the Secretary of State, which took place on 3d instant at the White House; and we also give a portrait of the PRINCESS CLOTILDE, who accompanied her husband to New York. The Herald correspondent said: " On Saturday the Prince called on the President at twelve o'clock, and was duly presented by the Secretary of State. The President received the Prince with marked courtesy, and welcomed him to the country in a few simple but hearty words of compliment. Without seeking, he said, to attach to this flattering visit of one so closely allied to the French throne, at this solemn crisis of the country's history, an undue importance, he could but feel that his presence at the capital was a guarantee of the friendly interest and generous sympathy of the French Government. The Prince, it is reported, listened with deep interest to the informal address of the President, and replied with brevity and much feeling."

The lady's name is Clotilde

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year 1861, by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


THE PRINCESS CLOTILDE, WIFE OF PRINCE NAPOLEON, NOW IN THIS COUNTRY.

 Maria Teresa of Savoy. She was born on 2d March, 1843, and is consequently eighteen, and very pretty. Of course, so young a person, however distinguished by birth, can have but little history as yet. It is said that she is very sweet-tempered and amiable, and extremely religious. One writer says of her:

Imagine a girl with golden-brown hair, and a skin of pearly whiteness, just dawning into womanhood ; a form already full and round, a figure of commanding aspect. Then the expression of the Princess's face is tenderly intellectual.

At the time of her marriage, the correspondent of the London Times, who saw her at the Opera with her future husband, on the occasion of the state visit of the King and the nuptial party to the theatre at Turin, said of her:

I can not indorse the statement of the Opinione that the Princess was brilliant with beauty. She is not beautiful, but she has what is perhaps better than beauty, a very sweet and amiable expression, which, I am assured, is but the faithful mirror of her charming character. She is rather petite and girlish-looking, with brown hair, and a beautifully white skin. Her bearing was graceful, and free from any sort of embarrassment, although her position last night, as the focus of the public gaze, must have been a little trying to a young lady not yet sixteen. (Next Page)

PRESENTATION OF PRINCE NAPOLEON BY SECRETARY SEWARD TO THE PRESIDENT.

Picture
French Princess Clotilde
President Abraham Lincoln and Prince Napoleon

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $165.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net


 

 

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