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Civil War Harper's Weekly, October 12, 1861

We have posted our extensive collection of Civil War Harper's Weekly newspapers on this WEB site to serve as a valuable source of original information of the War. We are hopeful that this extensive, free, online collection assists you in your research and study. These old newspaper have a wealth of eye-witness illustrations and narratives on this important part of American History. We hope you find this information useful.

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Privateer

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HARPER'S WEEKLY.

[OCTOBER 12, 1861.

650

SECTION OF THE EARTH-WORKS COMMANDING THE APPROACHES TO LEESBURG, VIRGINIA, ON THE SOUTH.—[SKETCHED BY A MEMBER OF GENERAL GORMAN'S COMMAND.]

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT ON THE OHIO AND MISSISSIPPI RAILROAD.

WE illustrate on this page the terrible RAILWAY ACCIDENT which occurred on 17th ult. on the OHIO AND MISSISSIPPI RAILROAD. The Cincinnati Commercial thus describes the event:

At ten minutes to nine on the night of 17th the train, consisting of six cars carrying about 250 men of the 19th Illinois Regiment, Colonel Torchin, had broken the bridge down under the following circumstances : The engine passed the bridge in safety, the first car was thrown off the track, but ran to a place twenty yards beyond the bridge; but

the second car fell directly into the creek, hind end downward; the fourth and fifth cars ran on top of the third, crushing it flat as a board. In the third car was Company I, where the greatest mortality took place. The sixth and last car, containing the field-officer and their attendants, was not injured.

Those who escaped represent the scene as full of every conceivable horror. Fires were soon lighted on the banks, messengers dispatched for assistance, and the work of rescue begun. All the while the air resounded with the groans, prayers, and imprecations of the sufferers.

Before daylight eighteen bodies were recovered in addition to rescuing all the living. Lieutenant Whotten was caught by both legs between two platforms, and it required three-fourths of an hour to chop and saw him out, every blow of the axe causing intense agony. A colored servant, caught in a similar though less painful situation, was

two hours undergoing the operation of rescue. A brakesman, with an arm and leg both broken, crawled from under the bottom car to a place of safety.

Fortunately, both the regimental surgeons, their hospital steward, and Lieutenant Kellot, also physicians, were in the forward car and escaped without injury. Companies I and G were the greatest sufferers—the latter entire company, except Lieutenant Bridges and two corporals, were more or less injured. The Colonel, who is an old Russian campaigner, Lieutenant Kellot, and Life-Major Moore, were accompanied by their wives. These ladies not only rendered great assistance in dressing the wounded, but even tore their under garments off their persons to make bandages.

It is not known whether the accident was the work of malice or misfortune.

EARTH-WORKS NEAR LEESBURG, VIRGINIA.

THESE are apparently but temporary breast-heights, inclosing a small encampment erected subsequent to the construction of the works. They occupy the brow of an eminence some four miles distant from Edward's Ferry.

The accompanying view is telescopic, and was obtained front the summit of a mount in the neighborhood of the former place. Numbers of the insurgents are daily seen on and near the intrenchments, although their force is very limited.

TERRIBLE RAILWAY ACCIDENT ON THE OHIO AND MISSISSIPPI RAILROAD.

Leesburg, Virginia
Train Accident

 

 

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