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Civil War Harper's Weekly, August 22, 1863

Welcome to our online collection of Civil War newspapers. This archive serves as an excellent tool to help in your study and research on the War. These newspapers will allow you to gain unique insights into the details of the conflict. Of particular interest is the wood cut illustrations.

(Scroll Down to See Entire Page, or Newspaper Thumbnails below will take you to the page of interest)

 

Gettysburg Hero

Gettysburg After the Battle

New York Riots

New York Riots

Black Army

Black Army

Gettysburg Battle Scenes

Gettysburg Battle Scenes

Remembering Gettysburg

Remembering Gettysburg

Cavalry Officers

Cavalry Officers

Charleston Siege

Charleston Siege

Jeff Davis Cartoon

Jeff Davis Cartoon

Gettysburg

View of Gettysburg

Soldiers Eating

Soldiers Eating

Morris Island

Morris Island

 

 

 

 

VOL. VII.—No. 347.]

NEW YORK, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 186 3.

SINGLE COPIES SIX CENTS.

$3,00 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE.

Entered according to Act of Congress. in the Year 1863. by Harper & Brothers, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York.


JOHN BURNS, THE ONLY MAN IN GETTYSBURG, PA., WHO FOUGHT AT THE BATTLE. PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY.—[SEE PAGE 534.]

THE STOLEN STARS.

[Not many weeks ago, at a dinner, at which were present Major-General LEWIS WALLACE, THOMAS BUCHANAN REAP, and JAMES E. MURDOCK, a conversation sprung up respecting ballads for soldiers. The General maintained that hardly one had been written suited for the camp. It was agreed that each of them should write one. The following is that by General WALLACE.]

WHEN good old Father Washington

Was just about to die

He called our Uncle Samuel

Unto his bedside nigh:

"This flag I give you, Sammy dear,"

Said Washington, said he; "Where'er it floats, on land or wave,

My children shall be free."

And fine old Uncle Samuel

He took the flag from him,

And spread it on a long pine pole,

And prayed and sung a hymn. A pious man was Uncle Sam

Back fifty years and more :

The flag should fly till Judgment-Day,

So, by the lord, he swore!

And well he kept that solemn Oath;

He kept it well, and more:

The thirteen stars first on the flag

Soon grew to thirty-four; And every star bespoke a State,

Each State an empire won:

No brighter were the stars of night

Than those of Washington.

Beneath that flag two brothers dwelt; To both 'twas very dear;

The name of one was Puritan,

The other Cavalier.

"Go build ye towns," said Uncle Sam

Unto those brothers dear;

"Build any where, for in the world
You've none but God to fear."

"I'll to the South," said Cavalier,

" I'II to the South," said he;

"And I'll to the North," said Puritan

" The North's the land for me." Each took a flag, each left a tear

To good old Uncle Sam ;

He kissed the boys, he kissed the flags, And, doleful, sung a psalm. '

And in a go-cart Puritan

His worldly goods did lay;

With wife, and gun, and dog, and axe, He, singing, went his way. Of buckskin was his Sunday suit, His wife wore linsey-jeans; And fat they grew, like porpoises, On hoe-cake, pork, and beans.

But Cavalier a cockney was;

He talked French and Latin; Every day he wore broadcloth,

While his wife wore satin. He went off in a painted ship

In glory he did go;

A thousand niggers up aloft, A thousand down below.

The towns were built, as I've heard said; Their likes were never seen:

They tilled the North, they filled the South, They tilled the land between.

"The Lord be praised!" said Puritan; "Bully !" said Cavalier;

"There's room and town-lots in the West, If there isn't any here."

 

Out to the West they journeyed then, And in a quarrel got;

One said 'twas his, he knew it was; The other said 'twas not.

One drew a knife, a pistol t'other, And dreadfully they swore:

From Northern Lake to Southern Gulf Wild rang the wordy roar.  (Next Page)

RESIDENCE OF JOHN BURNS, AT GETTYSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA.—PHOTOGRAPHED BY BRADY. - [SEE PAGE 534.]

Picture
Gettysburg Wounded Soldier
Gettysburg in the Civil War

 

We acquired this leaf for the purpose of digitally preserving it for your research and enjoyment.  If you would like to acquire the original 140+ year old Harper's Weekly leaf we used to create this page, it is available for a price of $165.  Your purchase allows us to continue to archive more original material. For more information, contact paul@sonofthesouth.net


 

 

 

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